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C.A. Boylan  |  Dec 01, 2010  |  0 comments

Tamron SP 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di VC USD Lens
Designed for use with AF 35mm, full-frame sensor, and APS-C sensor D-SLR cameras, the SP 70-300mm lens features vibration compensation and a silent ultrasonic autofocus drive. It has an extra low dispersion lens element made from high-grade glass. The angle of view (diagonal) is 34? 21’-8? 15’; the maximum focus...

C.A. Boylan  |  Apr 01, 2010  |  0 comments

The Orbis Ring Flash
Crafted from durable ABS plastic, the orbis ring flash is lightweight, portable, and compatible with most flash units. It easily transforms the harsh light of an SLR flash into shadowless light while producing the characteristic ring flash look. When used off-lens and to the side of your camera, the ring flash becomes a softbox or beauty dish. The...

C.A. Boylan  |  Feb 01, 2010  |  0 comments

The Spyder3Express From Datacolor
Datacolor has introduced the Spyder3Express monitor calibration system. This easy-to-use system is for both Mac and PC users and features unlimited license seats so you can calibrate every monitor in the house, regardless of the operating system. The suggested retail price is $89.

 

Contact: Datacolor, 5 Princess Rd., Lawrenceville...

C.A. Boylan  |  Sep 01, 2008  |  1 comments

Tamrac's Expedition 6x Photo/Laptop Backpack
The newest addition to the popular Expedition Series, the 6x is a medium-size pack for a generous amount of photo equipment. It will hold two D-SLRs (both with lenses attached), 5-6 additional lenses, a flash, accessories, and up to a 14.1" screen laptop. Lightweight (at 5 lbs) yet rugged, the main...

C.A. Boylan  |  Nov 01, 2010  |  0 comments

In keeping with our lighting theme this month, our Roundup entries cover the lighting gear and accessories beat. Keep in mind that Roundup is not a test report per se, but a place where we get to provide information supplied by manufacturers on new products and services.—Editor

Flashpoint Monolights
The “M” series is the latest...

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Oct 16, 2012  |  First Published: Sep 01, 2012  |  3 comments

It’s a good thing that early photographers didn’t have to pass through airport security with their flash equipment. The pyrotechnics they used to light a scene would surely have merited more than a pat down. Many years ago, long before the flash tube or flashbulb, a century or so before the Flashcube, cameramen used a flash powder called thermite.

Joe Farace  |  Jul 17, 2015  |  0 comments

Portrait photographers get to practice their craft with an amazing selection of different light sources, including everything from hot and cold continuous lighting to power pack-and-head and monolight flash systems to speedlights. Each has its own unique advantages and disadvantages depending on the kind of work you do but when it comes to flash, I’ve always been partial to monolights because of their built-in power supply. I’ve had a monolight fail on a job before but because the other monolights on hand had their own power supply, I was able to complete the assignment.

Joe Farace  |  Apr 11, 2014  |  First Published: Mar 01, 2014  |  1 comments

First impressions: the D-Lite RX ONE To Go Kit includes a pair of Elinchrom monolights so you know it’s going to contain quality products. Then you discover that the maximum output of each light is 100 watt seconds and you start to think you’ll need more power. That’s until you’re reminded that this fully loaded two-monolight Elinchrom kit sells for less than $700. Interested now?

Joe Farace  |  Dec 01, 2008  |  0 comments

“Something you threw together in crafts class, Princess?”—Buck Rogers in the 25th century

 

As a kid during the 1950s, I had one of the last Buck Rogers ray guns produced. These were actually flashlights made by Norton Honer but were designed to look like Buck’s ray gun. It’s only fitting that ExpoImaging’s Ray Flash ringlight converter projects light as...

Steve Bedell  |  Nov 26, 2013  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2013  |  1 comments

Portrait photographers are constantly looking for new lighting gear that will make their lives easier and produce great results. And while flash photography has been the studio standard for many years, it’s always been more difficult to previsualize the final effect since the image you see using the modeling lights is not always the same you see once the flash fires. The instant feedback of digital cameras has lessened that worry some, but you can still be in for some surprises. The new breed of LED lights eliminates most of these concerns with true WYSIWYG lighting, and with that in mind I was eager to check out F&V’s new K4000 LED Studio Panel to see how it could be used in my work.

Joe Farace  |  Feb 04, 2014  |  First Published: Dec 01, 2013  |  0 comments

Lester A. Dine invented the ringlight for making dental photos in 1952 but today people use them for all kinds of photography. A ringlight is a circular light source that surrounds the optical axis of a lens causing light to hit the subject from different angles, producing soft shadows in much the same manner as a light bank. When photographing people, the unique way that a ring flash renders light also produces a shadowy halo around the subject that’s much beloved by fashion photographers. I use a small ring flash to photograph butterflies, but if you want to photograph people, to paraphrase Jaws Chief Brody, “You’re gonna need a bigger light.”

Joe Farace  |  Sep 20, 2013  |  First Published: Aug 01, 2013  |  0 comments

LEDs may represent the future of studio lighting but a number of the currently available options come with a caveat or two for the new professional or aspiring pro. Some LED solutions are affordable but may be too physically small for efficient use in a studio, or they may be large enough but too expensive for the shooter who just wants to dip their toes into the LED waters. Measuring 14x7.5x2.75” and costing less than $200, Flashpoint’s 500C LED Light appears to be a good solution for the LED newbie who wants to see what all the fuss is about.

Joe Farace  |  Apr 26, 2013  |  First Published: Mar 01, 2013  |  0 comments

The important characteristics of any studio lighting system are the quantity, quality, and color of the light they produce. Other factors such as recycle time, type of output control, build quality, and the ability to accept accessories may be crucial, but for many of us the most essential element is price. I was impressed by previous Flashpoint monolights (April, 2012, issue of Shutterbug) because they’re rugged, dependable, and significantly, for the advanced amateur and aspiring pro, inexpensive. Now Flashpoint has introduced a new family of monolights—the DG series—that builds upon all of the positive aspects of previous models and takes them in a new direction.

Joe Farace  |  May 14, 2012  |  First Published: Apr 01, 2012  |  0 comments

A monolight is a self-contained studio flash that consists of a power supply, flash head, and modeling light wrapped up inside a single housing. Monolights are typically powered by AC current but there are times on location when an electrical outlet may not be so conveniently located and long extension cords can create safety hazards, even when securely fastened down. I’ve had people trip over taped cords and believe me, it can ruin your day. That’s why a new breed of monolights, such as Adorama’s Flashpoint II monolights, offer a DC option with a battery pack when you might be out standing in a field or, at one time during my tests, in a big parking lot. A switch lets you choose between AC or DC power provided by a dedicated Ni-MH battery pack that measures 7x7x3” and weighs 2.65 lbs.

Steve Bedell  |  Oct 03, 2017  |  0 comments

I doubt anyone could foresee the rapid changes digital technology has brought to photography. As a veteran of the business (40+ years), we have come a long way from the match-needle metering and manual flash units of the past. Heck, I can remember when thyristor circuits were a big deal because they could help us automate flash exposures.

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