Lighting News

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Jack Neubart  |  Apr 25, 2014  |  First Published: Mar 01, 2014  |  1 comments

For the studio photographer on location or shooting environmental portraits, connecting a studio strobe to a battery pack, battery-driven power pack, or pure sine wave inverter frees one of the constraints of plugging into an AC outlet and worrying about tripping circuit breakers or blowing a fuse, and it removes wires that could prove hazardous (combined with wireless syncing of the flash, I might add). And wedding and event photographers who rely on portable strobes that run entirely on external battery power are well familiar with the benefits—power that lasts and keeps pace with the event. There are countless choices, whether you’re just starting out or looking to upgrade or expand your lighting system.

Jack Neubart  |  Oct 01, 2009  |  0 comments

When you need the power and versatility of a studio strobe for location shooting and environmental portraiture but don’t want to schlep around a large, heavy studio system, you can turn to a portable lighting kit.

Steve Bedell  |  Oct 11, 2013  |  First Published: Sep 01, 2013  |  0 comments

“Look Ma, no cords!” That’s right; the Priolite does not have a power cord. It is run strictly off battery power. Each unit has its own interchangeable and removable battery, plus a built-in receiver to work with a Priolite transmitter. And, unlike most monolights, it has a usable modeling light even on battery power.

Dan Havlik  |  Dec 15, 2014  |  0 comments

We reviewed the Profoto B1 500 AirTTL battery-powered studio light earlier this year and while we, generally, loved this portable strobe solution the one thing missing was high-speed sync. Profoto corrected that this morning by offering a new High-Speed Sync (HSS) feature to the B1 that’s available now via a free firmware update.

Steve Bedell  |  Oct 27, 2015  |  0 comments

I had the opportunity to spend a couple of weeks with the Profoto B2 Location Kit. Said kit contains one power supply with two batteries, two flash heads, a carrying bag, and more. Profoto also sent me a bunch of light-shaping tools to experiment with.

Steve Bedell  |  Oct 18, 2012  |  First Published: Sep 01, 2012  |  2 comments

Recently I had an opportunity to test Profoto’s D1 monolight and their HR Softbox 1.5x3. To check out the combo the company sent along a Profoto D1 Air Kit that includes two D1 monolights, stands, umbrellas, and a case. I did not have the Air Remote to control the units from camera position.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Mar 02, 2015  |  0 comments

Profoto just released the new, more compact B2 off-camera flash along with a bevy of light shaping tools, designed for fast, easy on-location photography. The Profoto B2 is the follow-up to the pioneering B1 off-camera flash from 2013, which combined the portability (and ease-of-use) of a speedlight with the performance of a pro monolight.

Steve Bedell  |  Sep 19, 2011  |  First Published: Aug 01, 2011  |  0 comments

One of the biggest advancements in recent years in flash photography has been the ability to use your camera-compatible flash off-camera and wirelessly. Canon, Nikon, and others have developed their own systems where you can control multiple units that not only fire at the same time but also can be put into groups with their own settings.

Jack Neubart  |  May 22, 2015  |  0 comments

Light is a precious commodity in close-up and macro photography. The closer you get to your subject, the more light you lose through lens extension. Move to within inches of the subject and your camera or body may block the existing daylight. Also, the closer you get, the more depth of field you lose, so it would help to stop down. All of this translates to a need for additional light—in other words, a supplementary light source. What’s more, when shooting live critters and wind-blown plants, we may also need that light source to freeze subject movement, or at least provide shutter speeds that are fast enough to contain movement. To meet these needs, I’ve often turned to a macro ringflash and, alternatively, a macro twin flash. An economical alternative is an LED ringlight.

Ron Leach  |  Apr 18, 2016  |  0 comments

Reuben Wu is an artist with the fascinating vision of creating otherworldly landscape photographs that evoke both science fiction and 19th century Romantic paintings. He does this by selectively light-painting his scenes with a powerful done-mounted light.

Joe Farace  |  Dec 20, 2011  |  First Published: Nov 01, 2011  |  0 comments

Rime Lite (www.rimeliteusa.com) monolights are manufactured by Hyundae Photonics Co., Ltd., a company that’s been building high-quality studio lighting gear in Korea since 1981. They’re now being distributed in the U.S.A. by Dynalite (www.dynalite.com). The Fame Monolights are available in three different models that deliver 200, 400, and 600 watt-second output. (To see technical specifications on the three Fame monolights, go to the Instant Links section of our website, www.shutterbug.com, for this issue.) The monolights feature a circular Xenon flash tube and a modeling light that’s protected by a hard vented glass cover that easily screws on or off. Two knobs on the back of each light allow you to continuously vary the output for either the flash or the modeling light. A cluster of four LED-illuminated buttons let you turn on (or off) sound, the modeling light, the built-in slave, or the ubiquitous “test.”

Cynthia Boylan  |  Feb 02, 2015  |  0 comments

Rogue Photographic Design has updated their XL Pro Lighting Kit, adding new attachments and various improvements that include: a new Strip Grid, lighter weight materials, quicker attachment and a travel bag. This lighting system includes the XL Pro Reflector with two quick change attachments that allow users to create a softbox or a strip grid.

Jack Neubart  |  Aug 29, 2011  |  First Published: Jul 01, 2011  |  0 comments

Many of us use the speedlight’s built-in kicker panel to add catchlights to the eyes and thereby give the subject a more animated look. Regrettably, this built-in device plays a marginal role in filling in shadows. So we turn to much larger, more functional bounce panels, and although they offer distinct advantages, these third-party panels may not be as flexible as we’d like. Enter Rogue FlashBenders from ExpoImaging (www.expoimaging.com). These panels quite literally lend a unique twist to speedlight photography.

Joe Farace  |  Oct 18, 2013  |  First Published: Sep 01, 2013  |  0 comments

In this test, Joe Farace tackles a higher-end LED light source that he adapted to still photography work. In it you will find technical sidebars outlining how we will test LEDs for the still photographer in the future. We offer this somewhat tech-heavy review as both a close look at this unit and a primer on LED output and LED lighting, which, as Joe states, will become increasing important, and prevalent, in studio and location work for the still shooter.—Editor

Joe Farace  |  Oct 15, 2012  |  First Published: Sep 01, 2012  |  1 comments

One trend much in evidence for lighting these days is the use of LED as a light source. Rotolight, distributed in the US by R.T.S. Inc. (www.rtsphoto.com), has several new products in this space, beginning with their RL48-B RingLight. As a continuous light source, the Rotolight is useful for video or still photography. The basic RL48-B includes a filter holder and a Lee Filters Calibration Filter Kit (CTO: 205, 223, and 285; ND/Diffusion: 298, 209, and 216).

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