Photographer Profiles

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Barry Tanenbaum  |  Sep 09, 2014  |  0 comments

Mark Alberhasky, for one. Put him in a great situation where he can take very cool photographs and he’ll nail them nine times out of 10. Chances are, though, that won’t be enough. Just because the photos he’s making look good doesn’t mean he won’t be thinking about what he can do to create even better ones. You can attribute that drive to several factors, one of which is his early realization that if he took a straightforward photo of what everyone else was seeing, no matter how good a photo it was, it would be just that: what everyone else was seeing. The goal was to come up with his own ideas and add them to the creative process, and many of Mark’s photos are the result of taking that e

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Nov 25, 2014  |  0 comments

“Photography is always a bit random in the UK because the weather is so changeable,” Martin Turner says. When he and his friends arrived late in the afternoon at the Weston-super-Mare seaside resort in North Somerset, they were greeted by “absolute, gorgeous sunshine.” Which lasted about 45 minutes. “All of a sudden the sky went black,” Turner says, “and we had to stand underneath the pier whilst it chucked down rain for quite a while.” Then the clouds broke, and at about 8:00 in the evening he was able to capture this sunset image.

Ron Leach  |  Jan 17, 2018  |  0 comments

Yesterday we featured an eye-opening tutorial that explained how to be a better street shooter by overcoming a fear of photographing strangers. And today’s follow-up offers some great insight into the work of an iconic street shooter who once said “Street photography is a stupid term. 

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Jun 05, 2014  |  First Published: Apr 01, 2014  |  0 comments

The camera Michael carries might be his Leica M6, loaded with either Ilford XP-2 or Kodak BW400CN chromogenic film and fitted with either a 35mm f/2 or 50mm f/2 Summicron lens; or his Fuji X10 point-and-shoot with its zoom lens set for the equivalent of 50mm; or his Nikon D200 or D700 with the manual 50mm f/1.4 Nikkor lens he got with his F3 back when he was in college.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Feb 09, 2016  |  0 comments

Not long ago I caught up with Timothy Schenck, a New York-based professional photographer who specializes in the architectural stories of projects he considers will someday have historical and lasting cultural significance.

 |  Dec 20, 2016  |  0 comments

The legendary American photographer William Eggleston was a true pioneer in the potential of color photography and his quirky, eccentric portraits of everyday life can teach us all a lot about candid artistry and composition.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Feb 04, 2016  |  0 comments

There's a pretty good chance you know the work of photographer Michael H. Davies but perhaps not his name or his background. The image of his you've likely seen has become one of the more famous shots of this winter: a photo of someone tossing tea over their head in -40 degree weather near the Arctic Circle, the tea becoming a frozen cascade in the sky. The image, which you can see below, went viral and has been viewed by over 600 million people (and climbing).

Maria Piscopo  |  Feb 19, 2016  |  0 comments

It is true that documentary photography dates back to the Civil War but most photo history textbooks credit the era of the 1930s to the 1950s when photographers such as Robert Capa, Margaret Bourke-White, Dorothea Lange, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Alfred Eisenstaedt raised the public awareness of photojournalism and became famous for their magazine and newspaper work.

Jack Neubart  |  Dec 01, 2015  |  0 comments

For a sports photographer, the thrill of the game is superseded only by the thrill of capturing that peak moment of action. For the uninitiated, photographing a sport—especially football—can be intimidating and certainly challenging. Hit-or-miss, in fact. But not to a seasoned pro like Peter Read Miller. This illustrious Sports Illustrated photographer, who now largely shoots for commercial clients, shares with us his experience and knowledge of how to shoot the game of football.

Ron Leach  |  Feb 03, 2017  |  0 comments

Anup Shah considers himself a fine art photographer, and his amazing B&W images of wild beasts in Africa definitely take wildlife photography to a whole new level. Now based in the UK, Shah grew up in Kenya, where he says, “Wildlife was just outside the door in abundance.”

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Dec 30, 2014  |  1 comments

The kinds of commercial images Ann Elliott Cutting is likely to be called on to create for her clients are interpretive, fanciful, or elaborate illustrations of ideas and concepts. Or, in some cases, they’re all of those adjectives combined into one image. In other words, “create” is exactly the right word for what she does.

Ron Leach  |  Jan 13, 2017  |  0 comments

Finland’s dark winter months are when nature photographer Hannu Huhtamo is most active, using the nearly two-month polar night as his background for some exceptional light paintings. He employs nothing more than flashlights, his camera and some simple tools to capture these otherworldly images.

Jack Neubart  |  Nov 02, 2017  |  0 comments

When he graduated with a BFA from Kendall College of Art and Design, Scott Hoyle would have been very happy purely pursuing a career in graphic design and illustration. But along the way, something happened. In his senior year, he’d borrowed a camera from a classmate, entered a photo contest—and won a Mamiya Sekor SLR. 

Jack Neubart  |  Nov 22, 2016  |  0 comments

Tyler Stableford had always been passionate about storytelling, dating back to his college days. It began with the written word but soon metamorphosed into still photography. Before long, Stableford was working as an editor on two outdoor adventure publications, first Climbing Magazine, followed by Rock and Ice Magazine, where he was also able to pursue photography combined with his passion for adventure sports, which had had a hold on him since his teen years.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Mar 11, 2017  |  0 comments

So while many wedding photographers react to a situation to capture the beauty they might see, Scott Robert, as he’s known in the industry, feels that as a photographer who’s charging $10,000 or more, he’s got to knock it out of the park every single time, no matter what. So he became a director of brides, grooms, and situations.

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