Photographer Profiles

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Steve Meltzer  |  Jan 16, 2018  |  0 comments

Arthur Tress is a master storyteller who first gained recognition with his hauntingly beautiful book of images: The Dream Collector (Richmond, Westover 1972). The book was a challenge to the photographic ethos of its time.

Suzanne Driscoll  |  Oct 14, 2016  |  0 comments

There is no better time to look back at the work of Ansel Adams than this year’s 100th anniversary of the U.S. National Park Service. Adams was deeply committed to preserving the wilderness, and his black-and-white photographs of the West became one of the most important records of what many of the national parks were like before tourism greatly expanded.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Jun 02, 2015  |  0 comments

We assumed the first thing Jim Graham does in order to create his elegant landscape images is decide how to isolate his subjects from distracting backgrounds to achieve the always-desired single subject, clearly defined.

We were wrong. The first thing he does is ask himself: What do I see? Then he asks: How do I use the camera to communicate the feeling I have about what I see?

 

Cynthia Boylan  |  Jun 15, 2015  |  0 comments

A few months ago I had the great pleasure of interviewing talented photographer Edy Hardj, the creative powerhouse who become a red hot Internet sensation shortly after our story on him.

Lou Jacobs Jr.  |  Oct 14, 2014  |  0 comments

When I first saw this series of images of the little girl, I realized the photographer had carefully posed and lit the images in a delightful manner. The child portrayed in numerous styles is actually quite contemporary and lives with her parents in Melbourne, Australia. Her dad, Bill Gekas, is a professional photographer, self-taught and very adept at portraiture, though his main occupation is managing a family manufacturing business.

Lorin R. Robinson  |  Feb 06, 2013  |  First Published: Jan 01, 2013  |  0 comments

The Ojibways, inhabitants of the Lake Superior Region for some five centuries, had a name for tribal bands that lived on the south and north shores of the lake they called Keche Gumme. They were called Keche-gumme-wi-ne-wug—Men of the Great Water. If there is one non-Native American who deserves to be an honorary member of those lake dwellers, it’s nature photographer Craig Blacklock.

Jack Neubart  |  Jul 09, 2013  |  First Published: Jun 01, 2013  |  0 comments

“Whether the client is advertising a travel destination or a product, such as clothing or sports apparel, I strive to set up the shoot with talent that’s the best fit for the ad,” lifestyle photographer Dennis Welsh proclaims. “That’s what makes the shot and the client’s message believable. That’s what sells it to potential customers. For instance, if I’m shooting for a ski company or a ski resort, I want to find skiers who can easily do what I want them to do. That conveys a sense of truth and honesty. If you start with skiers who are not convincing, you start with a deficit. In that case, you have to do the best you can with what you’ve got. If I’ve got great talent and a great location, a lot of things are already working in my favor.”

Lou Jacobs Jr.  |  Nov 26, 2013  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2013  |  0 comments

Gerald Hill has been involved in photography for over 37 years and often explored creative work while employed in the aerospace industry in Wichita, Kansas. In 2003 he began to exhibit in several galleries that sold his landscape images, many shot in western states. Hill recognized that a grounding in art is essential to making effective photographs, and he made time to take classes with artist Charles H. Sanderson, who encouraged him to consider photography as his means of self-expression, and to learn the basics of visualization so he could capture his subjects with greater impact. As Hill went deeper into his studies he saw results: his compositions became both more dynamic and more personal.

Lou Jacobs Jr.  |  Oct 23, 2012  |  First Published: Sep 01, 2012  |  1 comments

Mobile, Alabama-based photographer Laura Cantrell says, “Mothers trust me to capture and preserve the magic in childhood.” Her photography business in Mobile was inherited from her father who sent his 17-year-old daughter on her first assignment to photograph a train wreck with a 4x5 Speed Graphic. By assisting her dad at weddings and shooting portraits she learned lighting, posing, and how to please clients.

Suzanne Driscoll  |  Oct 13, 2015  |  0 comments

“Every time I see your face it reminds me of the places we used to go…” sings Ringo Starr in his song Photograph, co-written with George Harrison on a yacht in the south of France in 1971. Much of the world may not be aware that Ringo is also a photographer who chronicled the frequent travels of The Beatles during their heyday in the 1960s.

Suzanne Driscoll  |  Apr 04, 2014  |  First Published: Feb 01, 2014  |  0 comments

Vincent van Gogh once said, “Stars are the souls of dead poets, but to become a star you have to die.” Vivian Maier (1926 - 2009) was an amateur photographer who had no desire to share her work with anyone during her life, and kept a treasure trove of over 100,000 prints, negatives, and films in five storage lockers in Chicago. By several twists of fate, they ended up in the hands of a few collectors who recognized their unique quality, and are now shown in books, documentaries, museums, and galleries throughout the world.

Lorin R. Robinson  |  Apr 11, 2014  |  First Published: Feb 01, 2014  |  0 comments

It is probably true that a photographer, through almost single-minded devotion to a place, can help make it known, understood, and appreciated. But the converse is also true. A place can make a photographer. Its beauty, its landscape, its human dimensions, its impact on the creative spirit can mold or shape a photographer—both as artist and person. That’s been the experience of fine art photographer William Davis in his 45-year symbiotic relationship with Northern New Mexico and the small town of Taos.

Jim Corbran  |  Apr 07, 2014  |  First Published: Feb 01, 2014  |  0 comments

The idea for Phil Pantano’s photographic series, “The American Worker,” walked into his office at a local steel mill in Lackawanna, New York, where Pantano holds a day job as a computer analyst. The man who came through the door was Jay “Elvis” Borzillieri, a fourth-generation steelworker whose father died in the mill. It doesn’t matter to the story what Elvis stopped in for that day, but when Pantano looked into his face a flash went off in his mind.

Jack Neubart  |  Jan 12, 2018  |  0 comments

One might say that Ben Cooper rocketed to stardom in high school. Back then he knew nothing about space launches, except for the fact that he wanted to shoot them. While not a sci-fi fan, he found himself captivated by the entire concept of going into space.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Mar 29, 2016  |  0 comments

What we look at when we look at a Sandro portrait is an image that is as much about Sandro as it is about his subject. About that he is frank and fearless.

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