Photographer Profiles

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Ron Leach  |  Feb 14, 2017  |  0 comments

Astrophotographer and professional astronomer Sergio Montufar makes some gorgeous images of starlit skies. And we thought the romantic image you see above, of Montufar proposing to his girlfriend beneath the Milky Way, would be a fitting shoutout to all our fans on Valentines Day.

Jack Neubart  |  Feb 07, 2017  |  0 comments

Documentary photography captures the truth but it also tells a story. And that is exactly what Nina Berman has always aimed to do, and what she succeeds in doing, as the Brits say, so brilliantly. Her pictures evoke our emotions; they often shock; but they never fail to open our eyes to the world around us.

Suzanne Driscoll  |  Feb 24, 2015  |  0 comments

Legendary celebrity photographer Terry O’Neill always wanted to be a jazz drummer. When he was 10 he made his own drum kit from cookie tins, and by the time he was 14 had quit school and was playing in jazz clubs with a local band. After a stint in the army, O’Neill thought he might get the chance to travel to the U.S. to play in clubs there if he worked as an airline steward. So he applied to what now is British Airways and was very surprised to be handed an Agfa Silette camera and told to take pictures of people around Heathrow airport.

Jack Neubart  |  Mar 18, 2016  |  0 comments

Photographing people for a living can prove intimidating for many photographers. Now add “celebrity” to that and you may find you have to step up your game several notches to stand on equal footing with your subject. You can’t afford to be intimidated and you certainly can’t afford to appear unsure of yourself or to question your decisions. You have to enter the picture with a game plan and be decisive, know which lens you’ll be using, what lights, and where to place those lights. But you also have to be prepared for the unexpected. That’s why they give these jobs to photographers such as Victoria Will.

Lorin R. Robinson  |  Oct 25, 2013  |  First Published: Sep 01, 2013  |  0 comments

He stands in about 3 feet of roiling surf, wetsuit jersey glistening from repeated dunkings. The sky above Oahu’s North Shore is deep blue. Undertow currents grasp his legs—eroding sand beneath his swim fins—as water rushes seaward to build the next huge wave. He holds his bulky waterproof camera housing tightly, faces west toward the setting sun and checks the long tether attached to his wrist. He turns his head to watch the wave rise ever higher—a towering blue-green monster that’s starting to curl, white spume blowing off its top. He braces himself as best he can against the forces raging around him, points the camera toward the golden Hawaiian sunset, and waits as tons of water begins to curl over him, forming a tube. At what he hopes is the right instant, he fires off several shots and prepares to be pounded and rag-dolled by the massive wave.

Joe Farace  |  Oct 31, 2014  |  0 comments

I think Mr. Erwitt’s talking about “the way you see” is the best advice for any photographer no matter what their experience level may be. One way to open your mind and eyes to different ways of seeing the world is to look at other people’s images, and that’s one of my goals with this column. Helping us with that today are four Shutterbug readers who bring their own unique views of the world to bear on the art and craft of photography.

Jay McCabe  |  Jul 25, 2014  |  First Published: Jun 01, 2014  |  0 comments

From the photos that Ben sent us prior to his graduation from Appalachian State with a degree in commercial photography, we were not surprised to learn that he grew up wanting to be a film director. “It was a big dream from the time I was a little kid,” he says. But when he got into photography, he found the still image had its own esthetic attractions, and practical advantages. “I can get my models to places I wouldn’t be able to get a film crew to,” Ben says, “and I’m able to create images that are visually more appealing than anything I can do on film right now.”

Joe Farace  |  Aug 26, 2014  |  0 comments

In any given issue of this magazine you’ll see lots of different genres of photography represented, showing the diversity not only of subject matter but also how these subjects are treated aesthetically and technically. It’s this diversity of style that makes the magazine so readable as well as so much fun. Our readers are a diverse lot, too, and this month you will see an all-readers’ Web Profiles. These readers come from all over the country and use a variety of methods to display their work, but they all have one thing in common: an overriding passion for the art and craft of photography.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Nov 10, 2015  |  0 comments

John Conn has photographed landscapes, landmarks, and the underwater world, but his passion for documentary storytelling has resulted in his most compelling images: apartheid-era South Africa, residents of a Bowery flophouse, patients in a cancer hospice, the subways of 1970s New York City, and, starting three years ago, the homeless of Manhattan.<

Jack Neubart  |  Nov 06, 2015  |  0 comments
Cole Thompson is a refreshing voice in photography, speaking through the medium of black and white as he sees it. Self-taught, he seeks out the simple and intrinsic beauty in life and the world around him. For Thompson, shades of black, white, and gray are enough to define the most complex elements that surround us, even the nature of the universe.
Cynthia Boylan  |  Aug 11, 2015  |  0 comments

Sophie Gamand is an award-winning photographer and animal advocate. Since 2010, her powerful and whimsical photography has focused on dogs and our relationship with them. She works closely with animal shelters and rescue groups to help promote adoption and animal welfare. We recently interviewed Gamand about how she became a professional animal photographer and, in particular, what draws her to photographing hairless dogs, which has become a recent focus.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Aug 25, 2015  |  0 comments

The temperature was 19 degrees on a late February morning last winter on the beach at Nantucket, Massachusetts. About 300 yards out the ocean was icing up, and the waves rolling in had the consistency of freshly mixed concrete. Checking things out was pro photographer Jonathan Nimerfroh.

Jack Neubart  |  Jun 07, 2016  |  0 comments

If we could describe Steve Bronstein’s trademark shooting style it would be: keep it real and keep it small. Bronstein is a wizard at breathing life into miniature sets and adding an air of believability to each one.
His mastery of perspective and scale is only a small part of that. He also knows how to make his lighting work for him to deliver one-of-a-kind masterpieces. And he has the most talented people working with him to ensure that each step in a project is taken on the surest footing.

Jack Neubart  |  Jul 11, 2018  |  0 comments

Social media collectively is an interactive medium through which the world shares experiences, thoughts and ideas, music, and, of preeminent importance to the photographic community, visual media. If you’re a Hollywood celeb, social media can help shape your career or even define it. If you’re a photographer, the picture may not be as clear on first glance. I spoke with four successful pros from across the country to collect their thoughts on how and why they use social media.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Dec 06, 2017  |  0 comments

Of course sports photographer Eric Bakke can capture the peak action moments. He’s team photographer for the Denver Broncos, shoots X Games for ESPN, and contributes sports images to newspapers, magazines, and organizations. Here, though, we want to talk about his pursuit of a different kind of sports image, one that most often pictures a single athlete and aims for art over action.

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