Lens Reviews

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Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Jun 14, 2018  |  0 comments

The specifications are impressive, but can a super-wideangle zoom with a super-fast f/2.8 aperture deliver the results pros and ardent amateurs demand?

Howard Millard  |  Aug 24, 2015  |  0 comments

If you spend a lot of time photographing wildlife, sports, aircraft in flight (or even UFO’s) I'm sure you've longed for a lens with extreme telephoto reach. Sigma now offers a tough, quality 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports lens that can fulfill the wishes of many nature and action shooters. In addition to the ultra long reach, the fact that the lens is a zoom makes it easy to frame the precise composition you want at a wide variety of distances from the subject—and for subjects in a variety of sizes.

 

Jack Neubart  |  Sep 03, 2013  |  First Published: Aug 01, 2013  |  1 comments

While the Sigma 150mm f/2.8 lens has been out for a good while we decided to take a closer look at one of the most interesting pro-oriented products in their lineup. One of the key selling points in this lens is built-in optical image stabilization (“OS” in Sigma-speak) to aid in achieving camera-shake-free, handheld exposures. Granted, image stabilization in a macro lens is not the be-all and end-all of successful close-ups, though it sure gives added insurance. And because the Sigma 150mm OS macro is optimized for full-frame D-SLRs, it allows for use at the stated focal length with such cameras and provides even greater effective focal length with APS-C-type SLRs.

Joe Farace  |  Apr 15, 2014  |  First Published: Mar 01, 2014  |  0 comments

Sigma’s 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM is part of their DC series of lenses designed for APS-C-sized sensors so the imaging circle is matched to the size of the sensor. For this assignment, I used a Canon EOS 60D with a 22.3x14.9mm sensor, producing an equivalent angle of view of a 28-56mm lens. Shooters of Nikon, Pentax, Sigma, and Sony cameras, the other mounts for which the lens is available, will achieve an angle of view equivalent to 27-52mm. Unlike other lens manufacturers, Sigma priced the different mounts the same ($799) so don’t feel you’re going to be paying a premium for your camera choice. Bucking a trend with camera manufacturers’ lenses, the Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM includes a lens hood at no extra charge.

Jack Neubart  |  Jan 06, 2016  |  0 comments

Call them what you will – ultra-wides or super-wides – I love ‘em. By covering a breathtaking expanse, these types of extreme wide-angle lenses are not only capable of capturing most landscapes, they also help sweep you into that landscape, making you feel a part of the scene in the process.

Stan Trzoniec  |  Feb 08, 2016  |  0 comments

When I was a cub photographer in high school, I was very proud of my Kodak Signet 40 camera. With the attached flash unit, even if I did not look like a professional, I felt like one. Later, thanks to my obsession with large aperture lenses, I moved up to a Heiland H2 Pentax camera complete with its awesome Auto Takumar 50mm f/2 lens that I carried throughout Europe and later for the local newspaper.

Henry Anderson  |  Jun 23, 2015  |  0 comments

Sigma has long been a leader in the third-party lens market, producing an astounding array of glass that’s compatible with major DSLR systems from Nikon and Canon (plus their own camera line) as well mirrorless and other camera manufacturers. While the collection of lenses has been staggering, it’s not always been easy to figure out if a Sigma lens is a high-end professional product or a consumer-level piece of optics from name and price alone.

George Schaub  |  Aug 12, 2013  |  First Published: Jul 01, 2013  |  4 comments

There’s something about a fixed focal length lens that brings the photographer out in me. It forces me to move in and back from compositions without resorting to a zoom. Yes, there are times when a zoom is most appreciated—especially the fast constant aperture zooms now available—but a prime puts me in a mindset that a zoom has yet to match.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Feb 14, 2019  |  0 comments

Admit it. You’ve always wanted a 70-200mm f/2.8 zoom lens. For many professional and enthusiastic amateur photographers, it’s the backbone of their lens arsenal. Here’s a great candidate if you’re ready to take the plunge.

Joe Farace  |  Mar 21, 2017  |  0 comments

In the trifecta of portrait lenses—85mm, 105mm, and 135mm—the 85mm focal length is the gateway. It’s short enough for tight shooting spaces, while producing a real portrait look, yet versatile enough for use in other genres, including photojournalism, where a nifty 50 comes up a bit short. Enter Sigma’s 85mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art lens ($1,199) that’s fast enough for reportage and long enough for portraiture.

Steve Bedell  |  Aug 09, 2012  |  First Published: Jul 01, 2012  |  0 comments

The Sigma 85mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM lens (average price: $969 on various Internet sites) is designed for full-frame cameras; with an APS-C multiply by your usual factor. At about 25 oz, I’d describe the lens as substantial, but not hefty. One of the reasons for the weight is the build—11 elements in eight groups, including the use of SLD glass, Sigma speak for Special Low Dispersion. The big chunk of glass on the end requires a 77mm filter. As to handling, Sigma has gone from their black “crinkle” finish to a smooth black rubberized finish that feels great to the touch. It’s plastic, not metal, but based on my experience with previous Sigma lenses, I’ve found them to be built to professional standards and can take a lot of abuse.

George Schaub  |  Jul 24, 2008  |  First Published: Jul 30, 2008  |  0 comments

The Sigma APO 150-50mm lens is a moderately fast, super-telephoto zoom designed to work with both APS-C and full-frame DSLR cameras. It offers quite useful close focusing (7.2 ft) and two modes of what they deem "optical stabilization" (OS.) Weighing in at 67.4 oz you always know its there, but then again this is one impressive piece of...

Peter K. Burian  |  Dec 01, 2007  |  0 comments

Although Sigma released their first lens with a built-in Optical Stabilizer (OS) system in the spring of 2004, the company employed this technology in only one pro-grade lens, the 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6. That has changed with the introduction of a more compact/affordable (digital-only) 18-200mm OS zoom. Sigma will not comment about future plans, but a reliable source indicates that...

George Schaub  |  Dec 01, 2009  |  0 comments

There is an underlying desire in every travel or street photographer to be able to carry one lens to cover all contingencies.

Peter K. Burian  |  Aug 01, 2007  |  0 comments

Because most consumers demand very compact, lightweight equipment, the majority of lenses are designed with a relatively small aperture: f/4 to f/5.6, for example. That makes sense because the same focal length with a wide aperture would be larger, heavier, and more expensive due to the oversized optical elements and barrel. Even so, many photo enthusiasts really appreciate an...

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