Photographer Profiles

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Loren Robinson  |  Feb 13, 2015  |  0 comments

Today drones are better known as unmanned military aircraft that appear in the news with ever-increasing frequency. There was less coverage years ago when they were used strictly for surveillance. But now, as they fire ordinance on suspected terrorist targets, these high-tech vehicles are rewriting the rules of aerial warfare.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Feb 12, 2015  |  0 comments

The jury of the 58th annual World Press Photo Contest selected an image by Danish photographer Mads Nissen as the World Press Photo of the Year 2014. Nissen is a staff photographer for the Danish daily newspaper Politiken and is represented by Scanpix and Panos Pictures.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Feb 11, 2015  |  0 comments

Renowned Magnum photographer Elliott Erwitt will be honored at the 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Erwitt (age 86) will receive the Outstanding Contribution to Photography prize in person at the annual gala dinner in London on April 23, 2015.

To coincide, a show celebrating Erwitt’s work from his 60 year career will be presented at Somerset House, London from April 24 to May 10, 2015 as part of the Sony World Photography Awards Exhibition. A rare public talk between Erwitt and his long-time book designer Stuart Smith will also take place on April 24th.

Jay McCabe  |  Feb 10, 2015  |  0 comments

“You can’t shoot the same thing all the time,” Sammuel Lopez-Licea says in response to our comment about the variety of subjects he chooses for his photos. The choosing is pretty much the easy part: many things catch his eye. What’s equally creative and most interesting to him is deciding how he wants to depict those interests—how he’ll use composition, framing, motion, light, and color, or how he’ll take color away in post-processing.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Feb 10, 2015  |  0 comments

“It was a two-month expedition, and it had taken weeks just to hike into the area and weeks to get to this point on the mountain,” photographer Tom Bol recalls about the above image.

Dan Havlik  |  Feb 02, 2015  |  0 comments

Swiss photographer Sebastian Magnani’s latest photo project is pure trash, which is exactly the point. Titled “Trash Heroes,” it looks at what we, as humans, decide to throw away and why.

Robert Hirsch  |  Jan 30, 2015  |  0 comments

The recent book Transformational Imagemaking: Handmade Photography Since 1960 is a groundbreaking survey of significant work and ideas by imagemakers who have pushed beyond the boundaries of photography as a window on our material world. These artists represent a diverse group of curious experimentalists who have propelled the medium’s evolution by visualizing their subject matter as it originates from their mind’s eye. Many favor the historical techniques commonly known as alternative photographic processes, but all these makers demonstrate that the real alternative is found in their mental approach and not in their use of physical methods.

Lou Jacobs Jr.  |  Jan 27, 2015  |  0 comments

Paul Cary Goldberg has long had a passion for two things: photography and food. A self-taught photographer, Goldberg’s love of food led to an interest in farms and farming as a way of life. Combine all this and you have Goldberg’s latest photo project, which involves documenting the life of the American farmer.

Dan Havlik  |  Jan 26, 2015  |  0 comments

Since 2011, photographer and physician Jeff Gusky has been rooting around ancient rock quarries in France on a mission to document a vast labyrinth of underground cities from World War I. The hidden cities lay beneath former WWI trenches, where tens of thousands of soldiers went about their daily lives under the French countryside as the Great War raged above them.

Jack Neubart  |  Jan 20, 2015  |  0 comments

San Francisco-based commercial photographer Mark Holthusen is constantly reinventing himself, rarely sitting still, except for the occasional interview. When he’s not shooting ads for one client or another using the latest photo and video gear, he’s creating theatrical productions or embarking on personal, photojournalistic projects, always seeking new outlets for his creativity.

Steve Meltzer  |  Dec 30, 2014  |  0 comments

Beth Moon’s photo book Ancient Trees: Portraits of Time is the result of a 14-year-long global journey in search of the oldest, most ancient trees on Earth. In this book of gorgeously reproduced black-and-white images, Moon takes us to into magical primordial forests and to isolated islands on a voyage of discovery.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Dec 30, 2014  |  1 comments

The kinds of commercial images Ann Elliott Cutting is likely to be called on to create for her clients are interpretive, fanciful, or elaborate illustrations of ideas and concepts. Or, in some cases, they’re all of those adjectives combined into one image. In other words, “create” is exactly the right word for what she does.

Steve Meltzer  |  Dec 26, 2014  |  0 comments

Carleton Watkins was perhaps America’s greatest 19th century landscape photographer yet today he’s largely unknown. His breathtaking landscapes of the Yosemite Valley were instrumental in preserving the valley for future generations and paving the way for both the National Parks system and the environmental movement.

Dan Havlik  |  Dec 22, 2014  |  0 comments

If the U.S. goes forward with its historic plan to open diplomatic ties with Cuba for the first time in 50 years, there will be a lot more photographers capturing this long isolated country. While Cuba hasn’t been entirely cut off photographically over the years, photo trips there have been limited and highly restricted.

Steve Bedell  |  Dec 09, 2014  |  0 comments

I recently received a copy of the University of New Hampshire Magazine and was immediately struck by the cover image of a rock climber dangling from a cliff over water. I not only noticed the storytelling aspects of the image but, as a photographer, that this guy hanging from his fingertips was somehow lit from some unseen light source. My first reaction: how did he do that?

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