Photographer Profiles

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Jack Neubart  |  Sep 15, 2015  |  0 comments

Award-winning photographer and filmmaker/director Vincent Laforet has observed the world from both sides now: on the ground and in the air. And these days, he much prefers shooting from an elevated perspective that is proving both challenging and exciting, with a hint of danger to spice things up. What is that element of danger? Flying thousands of feet up in an open helicopter—at night, no less. Strap yourselves in for a wild ride…
Who Is Vincent Laforet?

Steve Meltzer  |  Sep 14, 2015  |  0 comments

In 1955, armed with a couple of Leicas, several bottles of French brandy, and hundreds of rolls of film, the photographer Robert Frank set out on an odyssey to look for the soul of America. Behind the wheel of his black Ford Business coupe, he drove over 10,000 miles of endless highways and forgotten back roads; and made nearly 27,000 photographs. From these road-trip images he created a “photobook,” a work that has had a profound impact on photography and photographers ever since: The Americans.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Sep 14, 2015  |  0 comments



Characters from ancient myths, childhood fairytales and popular fiction have become a major part of our culture. We are all familiar with them and eager for more dramatic tales of romance and adventure. Like many of us, commercial photographer (and California resident) Michelle Monique has always been enchanted with fairytales and fantastical stories. The magic of photography allowed her to transform this passion into a reality and a successful career.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Sep 08, 2015  |  0 comments

Even though his first smartphone camera wasn’t very good by his standards—he is a professional photographer, after all—he liked being able to take quick, casual, spur-of-the-moment pictures when his DSLR wasn’t at hand, or when he didn’t feel like hauling it out.

Adrian Rohnfelder  |  Aug 28, 2015  |  0 comments

Kamchatka, Eastern Russia: I am standing at the crater rim of the active Tolbachik volcano, taking pictures. Suddenly the volcano spits out a red-glowing lava bomb that is heading precisely in my direction. Luckily enough it doesn’t hit me but lands just by my side. Although afraid at first, I delightedly grab my camera: this is a rare opportunity to take close-up shots from still very hot and glowing cinder bombs.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Aug 25, 2015  |  0 comments

The temperature was 19 degrees on a late February morning last winter on the beach at Nantucket, Massachusetts. About 300 yards out the ocean was icing up, and the waves rolling in had the consistency of freshly mixed concrete. Checking things out was pro photographer Jonathan Nimerfroh.

Staff  |  Aug 18, 2015  |  0 comments

Andy Biggs shot this striking image of a giraffe under an acacia tree on the Serengeti Plains in Tanzania, Africa, in 2007.

Jack Neubart  |  Aug 14, 2015  |  0 comments

It’s one thing to sit in the safety of a Jeep or Land Rover while photographing the wildlife of the Serengeti. It’s quite another to be one with nature, coming face to face with wild creatures on their level, and even to establish a certain rapport with the animals. Then add yet another ingredient: enduring harsh Arctic conditions for hours, if not days, on end, just to get that one great shot. Welcome to the world of wildlife and nature photographer John Hyde.<

Cynthia Boylan  |  Aug 11, 2015  |  0 comments

Sophie Gamand is an award-winning photographer and animal advocate. Since 2010, her powerful and whimsical photography has focused on dogs and our relationship with them. She works closely with animal shelters and rescue groups to help promote adoption and animal welfare. We recently interviewed Gamand about how she became a professional animal photographer and, in particular, what draws her to photographing hairless dogs, which has become a recent focus.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Aug 04, 2015  |  0 comments

John Paul Caponigro’s elegant, intriguing fine art images result from his control of a complex mix of inspiration, insight, and experience. And one other thing: his enthusiastic embrace of technology in the pursuit and realization of vision.

Chuck DeLaney  |  Aug 04, 2015  |  0 comments

Herb Ritts (1952-2002) began his career in the late 1970s, when photographers helped ignite the modern celebrity cult. The stars shone so brightly, the media coverage was widespread, and the public’s appetite was so great that the photographers were themselves illuminated by the glow from their subjects.

Staff  |  Jul 28, 2015  |  0 comments

The source photo for this beautiful image by Kathy Beal is from an iceberg she captured off the coast of Greenland in 2012. “Most of my images start with a base photograph, where I shoot for form, color, and texture,” Beal explains. “I then post-process the photograph in Photoshop, using a variety of tools and techniques.

Steve Bedell  |  Jul 21, 2015  |  0 comments

Imagine this. Take photos of many of the top names in the music industry over the last 30 or so years, from Keith Richards to Radiohead, Gregg Allman to Tom Waits. Shoot for Spin, Rolling Stone, Vanity Fair, and Esquire, to name a few. Make said images into a coffee-table book. And to top it off, have some obscure talent like Bruce Springsteen write the elegant foreword for the book. Is it just me or does this sound like a pretty good life?

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Jul 17, 2015  |  0 comments

Nope, editorial and advertising photographer Jody Dole doesn’t go down to the dump to look for subject matter. He’s more a flea market and tag sale type, and it was at the former that he met a picker who had, in Dole’s words, “really interesting junk—and an eye for interesting things.” Which is why Dole stops by at the guy’s place now and then, or vice versa, and an interesting thing or two changes hands.

Jack Neubart  |  Jul 14, 2015  |  0 comments

What defines fine art rests as much in the eye of the artist—be that a painter, sculptor, or photographer—as in the eye of the beholder who finds beauty and meaning in that work. The work can be something the artist discovers and captures or creates from scratch. In the case of photographer Hugh Kretschmer’s imagery, it is a tapestry interwoven with elements from disparate sources: a collage, if you will, forming a coherent whole and thereby conveying a message.

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