Photographer Profiles

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Dan Havlik  |  Jan 26, 2015  |  0 comments

Since 2011, photographer and physician Jeff Gusky has been rooting around ancient rock quarries in France on a mission to document a vast labyrinth of underground cities from World War I. The hidden cities lay beneath former WWI trenches, where tens of thousands of soldiers went about their daily lives under the French countryside as the Great War raged above them.

Jack Neubart  |  Jan 20, 2015  |  0 comments

San Francisco-based commercial photographer Mark Holthusen is constantly reinventing himself, rarely sitting still, except for the occasional interview. When he’s not shooting ads for one client or another using the latest photo and video gear, he’s creating theatrical productions or embarking on personal, photojournalistic projects, always seeking new outlets for his creativity.

Steve Meltzer  |  Dec 30, 2014  |  0 comments

Beth Moon’s photo book Ancient Trees: Portraits of Time is the result of a 14-year-long global journey in search of the oldest, most ancient trees on Earth. In this book of gorgeously reproduced black-and-white images, Moon takes us to into magical primordial forests and to isolated islands on a voyage of discovery.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Dec 30, 2014  |  1 comments

The kinds of commercial images Ann Elliott Cutting is likely to be called on to create for her clients are interpretive, fanciful, or elaborate illustrations of ideas and concepts. Or, in some cases, they’re all of those adjectives combined into one image. In other words, “create” is exactly the right word for what she does.

Steve Meltzer  |  Dec 26, 2014  |  0 comments

Carleton Watkins was perhaps America’s greatest 19th century landscape photographer yet today he’s largely unknown. His breathtaking landscapes of the Yosemite Valley were instrumental in preserving the valley for future generations and paving the way for both the National Parks system and the environmental movement.

Dan Havlik  |  Dec 22, 2014  |  0 comments

If the U.S. goes forward with its historic plan to open diplomatic ties with Cuba for the first time in 50 years, there will be a lot more photographers capturing this long isolated country. While Cuba hasn’t been entirely cut off photographically over the years, photo trips there have been limited and highly restricted.

Steve Bedell  |  Dec 09, 2014  |  0 comments

I recently received a copy of the University of New Hampshire Magazine and was immediately struck by the cover image of a rock climber dangling from a cliff over water. I not only noticed the storytelling aspects of the image but, as a photographer, that this guy hanging from his fingertips was somehow lit from some unseen light source. My first reaction: how did he do that?

Lorin R. Robinson  |  Dec 09, 2014  |  0 comments

In May, 2010, during one of his many trips to Tanzania, Norton was informed by local Maasai tribesmen of government plans to build a highway bisecting the northern part of the Serengeti, the storied 5700 square-mile national park listed among the 10 wonders of the world.

David Lund  |  Dec 02, 2014  |  0 comments

Being a former member of the Corps of Cadets at Texas A&M University, I thought about all the incredible memories I experienced and that others, even other students at Texas A&M, might not have known about. In 2012 I began to formulate a project that would both challenge my photographic skills and communicate this experience to the community, and world at large.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Nov 25, 2014  |  0 comments

“Photography is always a bit random in the UK because the weather is so changeable,” Martin Turner says. When he and his friends arrived late in the afternoon at the Weston-super-Mare seaside resort in North Somerset, they were greeted by “absolute, gorgeous sunshine.” Which lasted about 45 minutes. “All of a sudden the sky went black,” Turner says, “and we had to stand underneath the pier whilst it chucked down rain for quite a while.” Then the clouds broke, and at about 8:00 in the evening he was able to capture this sunset image.

Jack Neubart  |  Nov 21, 2014  |  0 comments

“I usually try to make the scene look and feel as natural as possible while still augmenting the available light,” Canadian-born photographer Peter Leverman observes. “I want the viewer to see the image and get what I’m trying to put across without the technique getting in the way.” By extension, Leverman knows when to leave well enough alone and simply use the existing lighting, in contrast to some photographers who prefer to noticeably overwhelm the scene with their lights.

Steve Meltzer  |  Nov 14, 2014  |  0 comments

By any definition, Sebastião Salgado is one the most important photographers working today. Currently he has a large exhibition of his work on display at the International Center for Photography (ICP) in New York City through the very beginning of January 2015. It is will be the last photo show at this location, before ICP’s move next year to a new exhibition space in New York’s Bowery neighborhood.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Nov 11, 2014  |  0 comments

The concept is elegantly simple: place the object of choice in a location of choice; take photograph; repeat as needed. The artistry is in the stylish sensibility you bring to the project. It’s a self-assignment for the imaginative and the adventurous. A skewed sense of humor doesn’t hurt, either.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Nov 10, 2014  |  0 comments

Switzerland-based photographer John Wilhelm's images are all-in-the family and out-of-this-world. In his whimsical and beautiful work, Wilhelm digitally inserts his three daughters into a series of outlandish scenarios that are fantastical, funny, and sometimes just downright bizarre.

Steve Meltzer  |  Nov 04, 2014  |  0 comments

Through his camera viewfinder Marc Riboud sees a world of gestures and graceful movements framed by elegant geometrical spaces. For over sixty years, he has photographed people and places with eyes full of wonder. Now in both New York City and his hometown of Lyon, France his delightful images from nearly sixty years of photography are on exhibit.

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