Lens Reviews

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Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Aug 30, 2018  |  0 comments

Attention wideangle prime lens fanatics! The new 9mm f/2.8 Zero-D lens from Venus Optics Laowa for Fujifilm X, Sony E and Canon EOS-M cameras has arrived.

Ron Leach  |  Jun 16, 2016  |  0 comments

Our Weird Lens Guru Mattieu Stern is at it again; this time with a review of a Jupiter 21M 200mm f/4 “tank lens” that he says has “astonishing contrast and bokeh.” Stern adds that the first time he used this lens he was “blown away by the quality.”

Ron Leach  |  Jun 16, 2016  |  0 comments

We’ve been giving a lot of love to big glass lately, and you won’t want to miss this video review of the remarkable Sigma 300-800mm f/5.6 EX DG APO IF HSM Autofocus Lens—affectionately known as the “Sigmonster.” It works with both full-frame and APS-C cameras, and on the later it provides a long-end of 1280mm!

Dan Havlik  |  May 26, 2016  |  0 comments

Our favorite weird lens guru Mathieu Stern has been testing out some unusual Soviet-era Russian lens and the results have been surprisingly impressive. In fact, in the below video, Stern pairs the Jupiter-9 85mm F/2 portrait lens on a Sony A7 II mirrorless camera and some of his still photos and video are actually quite amazing.

Dan Havlik  |  Apr 13, 2018  |  1 comments

Professional travel photographer Mitchell Kanashkevich gets asked one photography question more than anything else: what is the best lens for travel and documentary photography? The answer’s not so simple as he explains in the below video.

Henry Posner  |  May 21, 2015  |  1 comments

It’s been my experience that there are a handful of special objects in the world that have developed cachet or “mojo” and are emotionally appealing to people in various fields. Some of these unique items engage our interest because they’re otherwise unassuming objects which have become associated with unusual people or events. I think of the track shoes Roger Bannister wore on May 6, 1954 when he ran the world’s first sub-4 minute mile. I think of “Brownie” and “Blackie,” two of Eric Clapton’s Fender Stratocasters. The console Sam Phillips used in Sun Studios to record Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, and Roy Orbison must drip with “mojo,” as does Pete Seeger’s banjo, no doubt.

Shutterbug Staff  |  Apr 17, 2019  |  0 comments

Portrait and wedding photographer Julia Trotti loves prime lenses. In fact, she known for stocking her camera bag exclusively with primes whenever she heads out on shoot.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Jan 20, 2017  |  0 comments

Welcome back! Last week we covered lenses that are well suited for five of the most popular camera activities, including kids’ sports, travel and online auctions. If you missed that piece, you’ll find it here. This week—as promised—five more lenses for five more activities. These are sometimes thought of as being in the realm of more advanced hobbyists, but that ain’t necessarily so. Read on…

Shutterbug Staff  |  Jul 02, 2018  |  0 comments

What do you get when you compare three classic prime lenses: the Canon 85mm F/1.2, 85mm F/1.4, and F/1.8? Photographer David Flores found out when he recently put the Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM, Canon EF 85mm f/1.4L IS USM, and Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM lenses through their paces in a portrait shootout on New York City’s Coney Island.

Steve Bedell  |  Aug 01, 2009  |  0 comments

“Most pro lenses have much sturdier construction than their consumer counterparts.”

 

I’m a pro photographer and have been for about 30 years. I mostly shoot portraits and a few weddings. I’m not one of those guys who will be first in line for the latest 15-800mm f/1.2 lens. As a matter of fact, I’m pretty much an equipment minimalist. But when I need a lens, I...

Joe Farace  |  Mar 02, 2018  |  0 comments

When shopping for a wide-angle lens, presented for your approval, is a collection of our favorite (mostly) zoom lenses to expand your view of the world.

Patrick Sweeney  |  Apr 11, 2016  |  0 comments

Sometimes you want to capture expansive vistas without resorting to post-capture tricks like stitching multiple frames together; like on my latest excursion to Antarctica when I wanted a wider perspective than I achieved on an earlier visit with a 24mm lens (which transformed into a 38mm on my crop-body camera). The question I asked myself was ”how wide is “wide enough?”

Steve Bedell  |  Sep 14, 2011  |  First Published: Aug 01, 2011  |  0 comments

I really like extreme lenses. Extremely wide, extremely fast, and extremely long lenses will all allow you to create unique images that stand out from the crowd. When I heard about the Sigma 8-16mm lens I wanted to get my hands on one and start shooting, so I asked my editor if I could borrow one from Sigma for testing. He wanted to know what I was going to do with it, so naturally I told him: take portraits. You might, as he did, find this a little odd—taking portraits with a wide-angle lens, and a very wide lens at that. After all, don’t photographers usually use long lenses for portraits?

 

Why are photographers taught to use long lenses for portraits? There are four basic tenets behind this reasoning: narrow angle of view, shallow depth of field, flattering perspective, and a comfortable working distance between you and your subject. However, flip these “rules” on their head and you’ll see why I like working with wides: wide angle of view, great potential depth of field, unique perspective, and, oddly enough, working right in your subject’s face. In short, I use the special nature of a wide lens to give my portraits a new and unique look.

Roger W. Hicks  |  Aug 01, 2007  |  0 comments

"My" Leica M8--a loaner from Leica for review--came with a 50mm f/2 bar-coded Summicron. The 18x27mm sensor turns this into a 67mm lens in 35mm terms: rather long for someone whose standard lens on 35mm has for decades been a 35mm. So as soon as I got the M8, I started using other, older lenses. There is, after all, an enormous choice, from 12mm (18mm...

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz  |  Aug 01, 2006  |  0 comments

As we said in the review of the new Zeiss Ikon (ZI) 35mm rangefinder (April 2006 issue of Shutterbug or online at www.shutterbug.com), we received six of the seven Zeiss ZM-mount lenses announced at photokina 2004: 15mm f/2.8, 21mm f/2.8, 25mm f/2.8, 28mm f/2.8, 35mm f/2, and 50mm f/2. The 85mm f/2 (listing at $2759, plus $127 for the lens shade) still wasn't available as we...

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