Sports Photography How To

Sort By: Post DateTitle Publish Date
Ron Leach  |  Aug 22, 2016  |  0 comments

While most athletes have already returned home from the Rio Olympics, a small army of photographers and technicians are still busy packing up photo gear, miles of cable, and the latest digital technology. The video below gives you a look at all the equipment used by Associated Press photographers at the 2016 games.

Scott Kelby  |  Dec 15, 2015  |  0 comments

One of the things I love about sports photography is that no matter which sport you’re shooting, the actual camera techniques themselves have an awful lot in common. For example, while baseball and tennis are very different sports, the skills you need and the settings you use for shooting both are just about the same. To help you capture better images of “the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat,” here are my top 10 tips to help you no matter which sport you’re shooting.

Jay McCabe  |  Mar 15, 2013  |  First Published: Feb 01, 2013  |  1 comments

Bill Pekala, head of Nikon Professional Services, came to the US Open at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, New York, last August to run the NPS operation at the matches. Sports events can be the ultimate proving ground for camera gear, and one of NPS’s primary roles is providing their member professional photographers with the assurance of dedicated on-site support.

Jack Neubart  |  Jan 29, 2016  |  0 comments

Scott Serfas is one photographer who likes to get in on the action. In fact, he thrives on it. There is a certain amount of serendipity involved, but there is also a certain amount of passive control, in the sense that Serfas knows what to expect and expects the unexpected.

Staff  |  Nov 29, 2016  |  0 comments

Today’s camera gear is faster than ever and much of it is tailor-made for capturing any sort of motion or movement. So then why do so many photographers struggle to shoot compelling images of action? Part of it has to do with timing and part of it has to do with composition. Your camera and lens can only do so much and there’s more to a great action shot than simply capturing the moment and making sure it’s in focus. For this assignment, we were looking for images of anything from basketball to dance to wildlife, just as long as there was some kind of action in the scene. For the winning images, we were looking for great composition, effective use of backgrounds and scenery, and powerful emotion: human, animal, or otherwise. Here are our six favorites.

Dan Havlik  |  Sep 17, 2015  |  0 comments

There are few things that can get a man’s heart pumping like a new camera and a legendary car race to test it out at. Or at least that’s how I felt when I got a chance to take the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 for a spin at the Indianapolis 500 in May.

Lynne Eodice  |  Apr 01, 2004  |  0 comments

All Photos by Peter McGowan

 

Taken from the viewpoint of one who clearly loves the outdoors, Peter McGowan's images of water sports draw the viewer in and make you feel the excitement of the open sea.

 

Ron Leach  |  Jan 02, 2019  |  0 comments

Long lenses are exciting to use because they enable us to view and capture images with far greater magnification than what we can see with our eyes. They also deliver dramatic, compressed perspectives and enable photographers to isolate subjects from busy backgrounds.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Oct 13, 2015  |  0 comments

The race was more joy than suspense. American Pharoah had already taken the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness Stakes, and he led the 2015 Belmont Stakes from the start and was never challenged. Early on, racing fans at Belmont Park were pretty sure they were going to see the first Triple Crown winner in 37 years.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Dec 19, 2017  |  0 comments

That’s Carlos Correa, Houston Astros shortstop, in February, 2016, on a secluded beach on the south coast of Puerto Rico, training for the upcoming season. He’d been named American League Rookie of the Year for 2015, but no achievement was going to make this driven professional let up in his efforts to stay ahead of the game.

Lynne Eodice  |  Apr 01, 2002  |  4 comments

 

 

 

Capturing Sports Action

If you love shooting sports—whether it's a children's Little League or professional Major League game—timing is everything. Grabbing the shot at just the right moment takes a lot of practice, patience, and film (or a large-capacity memory card). You can do...

Jack Neubart  |  Nov 26, 2012  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2012  |  2 comments

“I started in my father’s darkroom, retouching negatives at 5 years old,” recalls New York City-based photographer Paul Aresu. “My father was a wedding photographer, with 10 studios and maybe 50 photographers working under him.” In his late teens, Aresu was already shooting weddings for his dad. “It grew from there.” He achieved a BFA from New York’s School of Visual Arts and went on to assist Pete Turner and Tom Arma for several years. “I learned a lot about the business from them.”

Jack Neubart  |  Sep 20, 2013  |  First Published: Aug 01, 2013  |  1 comments

“I have a mantra that I live by,” states San Diego-based Tim Tadder. “I believe that I work with the best clients in the world, and that they demand the best out of me. If the job calls for equipment I don’t have, I’ll make sure that I have it available so that I’m delivering the best product I can.”

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Nov 21, 2012  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2012  |  1 comments

Who: Robert Beck, staff photographer for Sports Illustrated.
What: Infrared (IR) photography.
When: “The editors give me some leeway,” Robert says, “but I’m not going to be using it for a decisive putt.”
Where: Golf courses all over the world.
Why: Although the job calls for capture of the peak moment, the turning point, the key play, the tense concentration, the moment when the athlete’s body language gives it all away, there’s always the professional and personal challenge to do something different.
How: With a Nikon D700 modified for infrared photography.

Lynne Eodice  |  May 01, 2005  |  1 comments

All photos © Sarah Silver

 

With a client list that includes Abercrombie & Fitch Quarterly, Hasselblad, L'oreal, Marshall Fields & Co., Nokia, and Beauty.com, Sarah Silver has achieved great success for a young photographer. Her images have appeared in Harper's Bazaar, Cosmopolitan, New York Times, InStyle, Elle, Surface and the Italian and French...

Pages

X