Photo How To

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Kim Wilson  |  Nov 12, 2012  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2012  |  1 comments

Lise Gagné is a stock photographer from Quebec City, Canada. An exclusive contributor with istockphoto.com since her first photo submission in 2003, she is a superstar on the popular microstock website.

 

Lise’s story is one of passion, persistence, ingenuity, and timing. As a graphic designer she often used photography in her work. One day, when searching for an image she needed for a project, she came across istockphoto.com and was immediately attracted to the idea of creating images for the then emerging market of RF (Royalty Free) images.

Susan Park  |  Oct 19, 2012  |  First Published: Sep 01, 2012  |  2 comments

With the profusion of new cards with various and often confusing classifications and ratings we thought it a good idea to get guidance on selecting the right card for your camera and way of working from an expert. We recently met with the folks from SanDisk and they were kind enough to offer the following synopsis of card and camera, ratings and usage.—Editor

Lou Jacobs Jr.  |  Aug 17, 2012  |  First Published: Jul 01, 2012  |  1 comments

Orest Macina says he is “a self-taught photographer interested in painting with light to capture the beauty all around us in vivid colors.” He holds a Ph.D. in Theoretical Computational Chemistry, and has worked in the pharmaceutical field. He first became interested in photography in high school, though his interest lagged through college, graduate school, career, and marriage.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Feb 17, 2012  |  First Published: Jan 01, 2012  |  0 comments

When Olympus and Panasonic launched the Micro Four Thirds system they offered adapters that enabled the use of regular Four Thirds lenses. Smart move, because it immediately expanded the library of available glass. The goal of Micro Four Thirds is smaller and lighter SLR cameras. The unanticipated benefit is compatibility with tons of lenses we all thought we’d never use again.

Lynne Eodice  |  Dec 01, 2005  |  0 comments

Lynne Eodice is an accomplished writer/photographer and a regular contributor to Photographic magazine.

 

Throughout the decades, artists have depicted still life scenes--arrangements of inanimate objects--in paintings and photography. Shooting still life subjects is one of the best ways to sharpen your photographic skills. You can take your time, and your subject...

Mike Stensvold  |  Nov 01, 2005  |  2 comments

Close-up photography--taking pictures at very close range--can provide a different outlook on everyday things, reveal details unseen by the naked eye, and turn common objects into intriguing abstract images.

The traditional ways to do close-up photography involves special gear: Simple close-up diopter lenses are inexpensive but reduce sharpness noticeably...

Text and photography by Mike Stensvold  |  Jun 01, 2005  |  First Published: Jan 01, 2005  |  0 comments

Long lenses are wonderful photographic tools. Their longer-than-"normal" focal lengths magnify everything, allowing you to get "close-ups" of subjects you can't (or don't want to) approach closely. The shorter long lenses (those in the 85--120mm range, for 35mm cameras) are ideal for portraits, because they produce a good head size at a...

Lynne Eodice  |  Mar 01, 2005  |  0 comments

Color often establishes the mood of a photograph, whether it's bold or subdued. Green is cool and refreshing, while red on the other hand, is fiery and passionate.

 

If you want to emphasize a particular color in a picture, keep in mind that some of the most pleasing color photos are ones in which one color or a group of closely related hues...

The Editors  |  Feb 01, 2005  |  0 comments

Good photographs needn't be complicated.

You can often make better pictures by thinking "simple."

Instead of trying to get as much as possible into the shot, try to include as little as possible. Ideally, you should include everything that adds to the picture, and nothing else. But that's a tall order for those new to photography...

Lynne Eodice  |  Feb 01, 2005  |  0 comments

When you view a smooth, shiny surface from the proper angle--such as glass, metal or water--you'll see a reflected image. These reflections provide you with a great opportunity to add interest to a photo by showing two different aspects of the environment at the same time. Since the reflected portion of the image is almost always distorted, it often lends a surreal...

The Editors  |  Jan 01, 2005  |  1 comments

Photography is one of those things you learn best by doing it. Here are some photo projects that will help you get more out of your photography.

 

1. Decorate Your Home with Your Photos
Considering all the time, effort and money you put into making your photographs, you should display the best ones for all to see. A good place to start is in your own...

Lynne Eodice  |  Jun 01, 2004  |  0 comments

If you're intrigued by architecture and its interesting details, chances are that you enjoy photographing stairways. You can capture interesting design elements, both in structure and in detail. Stairways can be depicted in their entirety with curved, sweeping lines, or can become an abstract subject if you zoom in on a close-up of...

Mike Stensvold  |  Feb 01, 2004  |  1 comments

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next to your camera body, the lenses you use with it are your most important photographic purchases. While physically, a lens is just a collection of glass or plastic elements held precisely in position in a light-tight tube, with a camera mount on one end and some means of focusing, creatively it's your...

Lynne Eodice  |  Feb 01, 2004  |  1 comments

Whether you're the proud owner of some hot new wheels, or enjoy shooting pictures at car shows, there are a few tips to keep in mind which will make your photography easier and more fun.

 

It's important to keep your camera angle in mind when...

Text and photography by Mike Stensvold  |  Jan 01, 2004  |  2 comments

There are lots of special-effects accessories on camera-store shelves, and they are well worth checking out if you're into special effects. But you don't need a lot of fancy accessories to create some interesting and unusual photographic effects. In fact, if you have a basic SLR (single-lens reflex) camera—film or digital—there are several special effects you can produce with no...

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