Photo How To

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
The Editors  |  Dec 01, 2003  |  0 comments

As winter arrives, so do incredible photo opportunities. Photography is photography, but here are some things you should consider about shooting in wintertime.

1. Exposing Snow
Short-answer quiz: What color is snow? White, right? Well, in our mind's eye it is. In the real world, though, it can be white (in bright sun), gray or blue (in open shade), or even pink (if your...

Lynne Eodice  |  Aug 01, 2003  |  0 comments

All photos by David Schultz


According to nature photographer David Schultz, "Spring and Fall are my busy times for picture-taking." Aspen and maple trees adorned in fall colors are big sellers at West Light Images, Schultz' photo gallery located in Park City, Utah. People also enjoy decorating their walls with spring wildflowers, he observes.


The Editors  |  Aug 01, 2003  |  1 comments

Sun & Games Fun with the sun...and more

1. Sun Stars
Your wide-angle lens at its smallest aperture can turn the sun into a star in your photos—fitting, since the sun actually is a star. The effect occurs because the tiny aperture diffracts the incoming light rays a lot. This diffraction causes the star effect. You can include the sun as a compositional. Photo by...

Lynne Eodice  |  Jun 01, 2003  |  0 comments




There are a number of ways to portray "heat" in a photograph. First of all, you can use color. Perhaps more than any other design element, color determines the mood of your pictures. You can establish the entire mood of your photo by emphasizing a particular color scheme—reds, golds, and oranges are...

The Editors  |  Jun 01, 2003  |  0 comments

Here are seven more ideas for some great shots this summer

1. Magic Moments
It's not just a summer thing, because a photographer should always be on the lookout for those intriguing sights of life being lived, but summer seems to produce more of them. Put your camera in full-auto mode, stay alert, and fire away when you come across something neat, be it people at work or...

Lynne Eodice  |  May 01, 2003  |  0 comments




It seems that everywhere you look, you see nature photos that include water in its many forms, whether they're waves crashing on a rocky coastline, snow on a hillside, dewdrops on flower petals, or a simple ripple on a pond. For outdoor enthusiasts who enjoy taking pictures of water, the possibilities are...

The Editors  |  May 01, 2003  |  0 comments

Adding a filter or two to your camera bag is a quick and relatively inexpensive way to improve your photos

How can you tell if you need filters? Take this quick test: Do you take photographs? If the answer is yes, you very likely need some filters to get the best possible images. Here are some that can really improve many of your future photos.


Text and photography by Lynne Eodice  |  May 01, 2003  |  0 comments

You've probably seen the photos of these exquisitely sculpted sandstone buttes; like colorful waves set in stone. You may have assumed--as I once did--that this area was part of some out-of-the-way corner of a national park.


For a long time, I couldn't find much documentation on this region, nor any information in guidebooks of the...

The Editors  |  Apr 01, 2003  |  0 comments








Photos by Jack and Sue Drafahl

One of the most common bits of advice drummed into new photographers is "get closer to your subject!" In that context, it means that novice shooters generally shoot from too far away, so their subject is lost among all the other stuff in the...

Lynne Eodice  |  Mar 01, 2003  |  0 comments





When a photo emphasizes a particular color, it often dictates the mood of the picture—be it warm or cool, bright or muted. Blue is usually associated with soothing, cool and more-somber moods. Conversely, the color red conjures up emotions like passion, heat, love, and even anger.

We often...

Mike Stensvold  |  Feb 01, 2003  |  0 comments





All photos by Mike Stensvold unless otherwise stated.

It's probably true that real artists are born, not made. But there is a lot anyone can do to make his or her photographs more interesting, and the tips on these pages should help you improve yours.

Seeing is the fun part of...

Lynne Eodice  |  Oct 01, 2002  |  0 comments




When photographing interesting cities, you'll find it very convenient to travel light—a point-and-shoot camera will free you to concentrate on compositions and allow you to respond more quickly to great photo opportunities. If your camera has a built-in zoom lens, use it at its widest setting for...

Lynne Eodice  |  Sep 01, 2002  |  0 comments




If you enjoy photographing architectural details, chances are that you also love taking pictures of windows. As subjects, windows are plentiful, and they usually represent a particular style or character of the building that they inhabit. Whether it's an elaborate stained glass window of a church, or a...

Mike Stensvold  |  Jun 01, 2002  |  0 comments









A great tool for creative photographers

You can't beat the 35mm SLR for its combination of features, price and performance. And one its best features is its ability to accept a wide range of interchangeable lenses. From superwide fisheye to supertelephoto, macro...

The Editors  |  Jan 01, 2002  |  0 comments

Here are 10 ways to get your creative juices flowing . . . and some great photos

1. Discover Your Own Backyard

If you put your mind to it, you can find lots of neat photo subjects right in your own backyard. (If you live in an apartment and don't have a formal backyard, don't worry—this assignment is about...