Photo How To

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Jim Zuckerman  |  Sep 30, 2014  |  0 comments

One of my favorite details to photograph is ice. It is as artistic and intriguing as anything you’ll encounter, and I never tire of the beautiful patterns and shapes I find. From ice crystals on a window (#1), to the impressive formations of glacial ice, such as (#2 and #3), the abstracts in ice that nature generates has been a life-long fascination for me.

Maria Piscopo  |  Sep 30, 2014  |  0 comments

Beyond learning how to handle cameras and photo equipment, working as a photo assistant will teach you many lessons that will go a long way toward helping you build a successful career. Skills you’d most likely garner include learning about project management, studio protocols, location procedures, dealing with clients, preproduction and postproduction work, and more. These are all essential business skills and can often be learned only “on the job.” Indeed, talk to many established pros today and you’ll find that’s how they got their start.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Sep 16, 2014  |  0 comments

You’d wash your car inside and out before you tried to sell it, right? At the least you’d vacuum the dog hair from the back seat. Why do so many people offer downright dirty cameras and lenses for sale at online auction websites? While you cannot (and should not) remove signs of wear, you can easily make used gear clean and presentable.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Sep 12, 2014  |  0 comments

Looking for some fresh places to take pictures as the summer winds down? You may be living near one of autumn’s best locations and not even know it. 

Jeff Wignall  |  Sep 05, 2014  |  0 comments

When it comes to subjects that combine color and light in creative and interesting ways, few things are as eye-catching or as fun to encounter as an artfully designed neon sign. If I’m out driving on a summer’s night and see a particularly interesting bit of neon, it’s hard not to pull the car over just to admire the sign maker’s skill and take a few pictures to add to my collection.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Aug 29, 2014  |  0 comments

Deleted images do not “go away.” Formatting a memory card does not “erase” the images. Never sell or loan a memory card unless you’re willing to share every image that’s ever been on it.

George Schaub  |  Aug 19, 2014  |  0 comments

In this article we’ll be exploring various in-camera creative options. Today’s cameras contain microprocessors that are like having a custom photo lab and graphic art studio built-in. In the color realm they allow you to choose color saturation (vividness), neutralize or enhance color casts (white balance) and even create custom color renditions to match every subject and scene. Drive modes allow you to capture fast action “in a hurry” and pick out the best frame, aiding you in getting the best sports shots you ever made.

Jim Zuckerman  |  Aug 19, 2014  |  0 comments

HDR stands for High Dynamic Range. What this refers to is the digital sensor’s ability (or lack of ability) to render good detail in both the highlights and the shadows in a photograph. Our eye/brain combination is extremely sophisticated, and as we look at a contrasty scene (such as a landscape in noon sunlight) the detail in the shadows and in the bright sunny areas is quite clear to us. A photograph will not look the same as we see it.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Aug 14, 2014  |  0 comments

What’s proper etiquette when capturing chow with a digital camera? If you like to shoot your food, here are a couple handy tips. 

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Aug 07, 2014  |  First Published: Aug 08, 2014  |  0 comments

You've seen this technique used to streak lights in night scenes, right? Well, you don’t have to wait until it gets dark to join the fun. Learn how to do this easy trick and you can isolate your main subject from a crowded background.

Jim Zuckerman  |  Jul 21, 2014  |  1 comments

Everyone is insecure about getting the correct exposure. We have good reason to be insecure because too often we’ve experienced over- and underexposures when we didn’t expect it, and that leaves a lasting impression that exposure technique is a mysterious and elusive thing.

Jim Zuckerman  |  Jun 20, 2014  |  0 comments

One of the first techniques I learned in photography was to use long exposures at night to blur traffic lights. I liked it decades ago, and I still enjoy seeing artful streaks of light superimposed over an urban environment. You never know exactly what the resulting images will look like, and that’s part of the fun. When the background happens to striking, like the Walt Disney Theater in Los Angeles, California (#1), the combination of abstract lights and architecture makes a winning photograph.

Suzanne Driscoll  |  Jun 20, 2014  |  First Published: May 01, 2014  |  0 comments

Known as a master of combining art in the traditional sense with photography, Chiarenza has been making pictures for five decades. He started out with tightly framed, documentary-style photographs that sparked a lifelong interest in abstract images and landscapes. But since 1979 he has been making collages out of scraps of paper, foil, can lids, and whatever else he finds or people send him. He then photographed the collages with Polaroid positive/negative film, always in black and white. Using light, shapes, forms, and surfaces, the results are very unique images that encourage the viewer to let his or her imagination do all the interpretation.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Jun 05, 2014  |  First Published: Apr 01, 2014  |  0 comments

The camera Michael carries might be his Leica M6, loaded with either Ilford XP-2 or Kodak BW400CN chromogenic film and fitted with either a 35mm f/2 or 50mm f/2 Summicron lens; or his Fuji X10 point-and-shoot with its zoom lens set for the equivalent of 50mm; or his Nikon D200 or D700 with the manual 50mm f/1.4 Nikkor lens he got with his F3 back when he was in college.

David Grover  |  Jun 03, 2014  |  First Published: Apr 01, 2014  |  0 comments

An exposed photographic plate or a segment of exposed film inside a dark camera body are analog equivalents of today’s Raw file. Before digital technology made it possible to capture visual images electronically, a photograph was visible only after it had been processed in a darkroom with chemicals. Now the processing is handled either in camera or by Raw rendering software. The word “Raw” is not an acronym; it’s a simple description for a file that contains pure data, invisible to the human eye.

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