Photo How To

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Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Feb 17, 2015  |  0 comments

Modern digital cameras perform so well under dim light at high ISO settings that some photographers haven’t used a camera flash for months (maybe even longer). Well, here’s a news flash for them: for a small investment and a little practice they can turn most shoe-mount flash units into a controllable package of portable sunshine.

Lou Manna  |  Feb 12, 2015  |  0 comments

Editor’s Note: Food photographer Lou Manna has spent over 30 years creating images of all things edible. We recently asked Manna to share some of his wisdom with Shutterbug’s readers he provided us with the following helpful tips for how to shoot the best food photos. You can see more of Manna’s work on his website, or read his thoughts on food photography and see more images at his blog.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Jan 29, 2015  |  0 comments

Some discouraged photographers complain and say they can’t get good shots because they don’t have the time or funds to travel to exotic, photogenic places. Sorry to rain on their pity party, but everyone can get decent images without a travel budget. Here are a couple projects you can start on tonight, as soon as it gets dark.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Jan 21, 2015  |  0 comments

For centuries, scientists have labored to understand the nature of light. Some ancient Greeks believed that light was emitted from the eyeball the same way a bat sends out an echolocation chirp which allows him to determine his precise position in physical space. Understandably, there were problems with that hypothesis. Other theories followed. Those who embraced the wave theory were right—mostly. Light behaves like a wave up to a certain point. Similarly, those who professed the particle theory were also correct—partly.

Maria Piscopo  |  Jan 20, 2015  |  0 comments

Photographers have always looked to the fine art field as a marketing outlet for their personal work but can you really make money from art sales? How do you establish yourself in the business? What are the best marketing tools for finding gallery representation and fine art clients? Is your work truly “fine art”? Certainly there will be many similarities to marketing consumer or commercial photography but the fine art world has some unique pitfalls and opportunities to watch for if you plan to expand into this field.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Jan 08, 2015  |  0 comments

Free lenses. That’s right. They’re everywhere. And that’s not just my cabin fever yapping. 

Jim Zuckerman  |  Dec 24, 2014  |  0 comments

There are many kinds of white light. At first this statement seems like it doesn’t make sense, but if you look closely at a typical light bulb in your living room (the old kind, not the new florescent type of bulbs) and compare it with, say, a daylight florescent fixture, the light bulb is much more yellow than the florescent light. Similarly, if you compare sunrise and sunset lighting to the light from an overcast sky at noon, the lighting from low angled sunlight is very yellow—it looks golden, in fact—and the cloudy sky produces a white light that is more bluish.

Jim Zuckerman  |  Nov 24, 2014  |  0 comments

There are many kinds of white light. At first this statement seems like it doesn’t make sense, but if you look closely at a typical light bulb in your living room (the old kind, not the new florescent type of bulbs) and compare it with, say, a daylight florescent fixture, the light bulb is much more yellow than the florescent light. Similarly, if you compare sunrise and sunset lighting to the light from an overcast sky at noon, the lighting from low angled sunlight is very yellow—it looks golden, in fact—and the cloudy sky produces a white light that is more bluish.

Maria Piscopo  |  Nov 18, 2014  |  1 comments

Even with today’s “everyone with a camera is a photographer” syndrome, the event photography business is still ripe for making sales. With event photography, clients can’t use stock photos and shooting their own images often turns out to be below par, at best. It is a very specialized field of professional photography requiring both personal and business skills.

Blaine Harrington  |  Oct 29, 2014  |  0 comments

Chuck Berry was right. “It goes to show you never can tell,” he wrote, and sang, and that phrase is as appropriate a way to begin this column as any I can think of. I certainly never can tell which photo will please the client, fulfill the assignment, or sell well through my stock agencies; in other words, which one will succeed in the marketplace.

Hugh O. Smith  |  Oct 27, 2014  |  0 comments

Back in the 70’s when I started my photography career as a street photographer/photojournalist we had some pretty hefty equipment. Protecting it from the elements and potential thieves was our main concern. We didn’t have much in the way of small photo bags other than pricey leather ones that protected the gear but screamed: “Take me. I’m expensive!”

Dan Havlik  |  Oct 22, 2014  |  0 comments

Dan Root is a buddy of mine who is always doing something interesting photographically. His most recent project is a mind-bending series of black-and-white photos called Quadratis.

Howard Millard  |  Sep 30, 2014  |  1 comments

Are you someone who appreciates the richtones, colors and textures of 19th and 20th century alternative photo processes? With onOne Software’s Perfect B&W (www.ononesoftware.com), you can imbue your own images with these classic looks, and you won’t have to spend days in the darkroom to do it. Options include Platinum and Palladium, the warm beige tones and mottled surface of Calotype, the blue hues of Cyanotype, the buff tones of an Albumen print, the velvety reds of a warm Carbon print, even the look of a Tintype and many more.

Jim Zuckerman  |  Sep 30, 2014  |  0 comments

One of my favorite details to photograph is ice. It is as artistic and intriguing as anything you’ll encounter, and I never tire of the beautiful patterns and shapes I find. From ice crystals on a window (#1), to the impressive formations of glacial ice, such as (#2 and #3), the abstracts in ice that nature generates has been a life-long fascination for me.

Maria Piscopo  |  Sep 30, 2014  |  0 comments

Beyond learning how to handle cameras and photo equipment, working as a photo assistant will teach you many lessons that will go a long way toward helping you build a successful career. Skills you’d most likely garner include learning about project management, studio protocols, location procedures, dealing with clients, preproduction and postproduction work, and more. These are all essential business skills and can often be learned only “on the job.” Indeed, talk to many established pros today and you’ll find that’s how they got their start.

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