Compact Camera Reviews

Sort By: Post DateTitle Publish Date
Jack Neubart  |  May 11, 2015  |  0 comments

I’ve often wished I had a camera that could go from 24mm to 2000mm at the touch of a button and without being weighed down by a ton of glass. Okay, maybe not all the way to 2000mm and perhaps not in a power zoom, but you get my point. The Nikon Coolpix P900 superzoom (super-duper-zoom?) camera gives you that reach in a fairly compact body, relative to a lens with such a broad range of focal lengths.

George Schaub  |  Oct 28, 2011  |  0 comments

The new Nikon P7100 offers many function buttons and dials along with a large mode dial on the top to choose standard exposure modes like P, S, A and M. The camera offers a full automatic mode, scene modes and special effect modes (like B&W, sepia tone effect, “High Key” effect and more). In addition, the P7100 offers three user modes that can be saved as U1-U3 and accessed directly on the mode dial.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Jul 23, 2013  |  First Published: Jun 01, 2013  |  1 comments

The Olympus XZ-2 is the successor of the XZ-1 which was the first compact camera made by Olympus with a large sensor (1/1.63”). The new camera has a new CMOS sensor (the XZ-1 had a CCD sensor) which is slightly smaller but has a slightly higher resolution (12MP instead of 10MP).

Cynthia Boylan  |  Jan 07, 2016  |  0 comments

Holga 135 BC Plastic Lens 35mm Film Camera: The BC stands for Black Corners effect and it creates prominent vignettes in your 35mm photos. The Holga uses all 35mmm formats films and it can operate without any batteries. There is a hot shoe on 135 BC, that allows you to use a flash when taking pictures at dark environments ( the flash is available separately). The Holga 135 BC is a fixed focus camera that offers four choices of object distances and two choice of aperture (f/11 and f/8). The Multiple Exposure effect can be easily achieve by not advancing the film after a frame has been exposed. There is a Lens/Filter for different effects available as an optional accessory. 

Jason Schneider  |  May 02, 2016  |  0 comments

Active lifestyle cameras are aimed at photographers who don’t want to worry about their equipment during their adventures, but do want to capture images they can be proud of—even under challenging conditions. All seven cameras on this list are virtually indestructible, high-performance compacts that are perfect for skiing, surfing, taking to the beach, boating, hiking or any other activity where an unprotected DSLR or mirrorless camera could be damaged. 

Edited by George Schaub  |  Jul 20, 2012  |  First Published: Jun 01, 2012  |  3 comments

The Panasonic FZ150 is a super-zoom bridge camera with a 12MP sensor and an integral 24x zoom lens. The design of the body is similar to classic SLR systems, but the camera has no interchangeable lens system. It offers a zoom lens that ranges from a wide-angle setting (25mm) to an extreme tele setting (600mm, 35mm film equivalent). The FZ150 utilizes Panasonic’s newest version of the O.I.S. (Optical Image Stabilizer), dubbed “Power O.I.S.” It works very well and allows users to shoot images with long shutter speed settings as slow as 1/20 sec when using the maximum tele setting of 600mm.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Dec 13, 2016  |  0 comments

When it comes to Bridge cameras, Panasonic has established itself as one of the major players. The new Panasonic FZ2500 has a new 20x lens system (a Leica DC Vario-Elmarit) that covers a focal length range of 24 to 480mm (35mm film equivalent in 3:2 mode). The lens speed is f/2.8 in wide angle and f/4.5 at maximum focal length. Those very long tele settings require powerful image stabilization and the FZ2500 delivers with an optical and electronic hybrid stabilizer system which is able to level out up to 5 axis movements. We do note that when recording 4K videos only the optical stabilizer is available. The 13.2x8.8mm sensor has 20MP resolution.

George Schaub  |  Oct 10, 2011  |  0 comments

This is a test report on the new Panasonic FZ48 integral lens camera. The camera looks like a compact SLR. It has a big grip on the right hand side of the body, which allows for comfortable handling for shooting, important for a long-range zoom such as this.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Nov 29, 2017  |  0 comments

The Panasonic Lumix DC-FZ80 is a superzoom bridge camera for photographers on a budget. It features a small, 1/2.33-inch sensor with a resolution of 18MP. A massive lens system in the Panasonic FZ80 provides a focal length range between 20-1200mm (35mm film equivalent) and a whopping 60x zoom. Using the digital zoom, photographers can take photos with a focal length equivalent of 4800mm.

Edited by George Schaub  |  May 26, 2015  |  0 comments

Panasonic’s LX100 is the top-of-the-line camera in the company’s compact LX series. Compared to other LX models, it is the first camera with an MFT (Micro Four Thirds) sensor. However, the camera doesn’t use the whole image sensor area of 17.3x13mm, so its crop factor is 2.2x instead of the 2.0x of standard MFT cameras.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Jul 26, 2013  |  First Published: Jun 01, 2013  |  2 comments

The Panasonic LX7 is the top model of Panasonic’s compact camera range. It uses a (large) 1/1.7” image sensor and has a moderate image resolution of 10MP, the same resolution as the forerunner LX5 but with a new lens system with outstanding speed capabilities. It offers a maximum aperture of f/1.4, with only f/2.3 when using the maximum focal length of 90mm (35mm film equivalent). This allows the user to shoot images with a shallow depth of field—something compact cameras have often failed to offer. To change the aperture setting the photographer uses a very handy lens ring on the front of the camera. When using M mode the shutter speed is changed with a comfortable setup dial on the back.

George Schaub  |  Dec 01, 2010  |  0 comments

The promise of Micro Four Thirds system cameras is that you get the light weight and portability of a smallish point-and-shoot camera with the lens interchangeability and functions of an advanced D-SLR.

Joe Farace  |  Jan 14, 2014  |  First Published: Dec 01, 2013  |  0 comments

The Pentax MX was a 35mm Single Lens Reflex (SLR) camera produced from 1976 to 1985 and, for a time, was the company’s flagship SLR. It was solidly built featuring all-mechanical construction, including the shutter, and only the metering system was battery dependent. The new all-digital, all-electronic Pentax MX-1 couldn’t be more different. For openers, the MX-1 is not an SLR but an advanced digital compact camera with the kind of retro styling that’s all the rage these days with camera designers and, apparently, camera buyers, too. So, how does the MX-1 stack up?

George Schaub  |  Jun 27, 2011  |  0 comments

The Pentax WG-1 GPS is a compact camera with a 5x zoom lens (28-140mm) and a robust body, which is water proved to 33 ft, shock proof (5 ft drop down) and an integrated GPS system. The camera offers 14 MP resolution and some extraordinary features like “Digital Microscope” mode.

George Schaub  |  Dec 06, 2012  |  0 comments

The Pentax Optio WG-2 GPS is a rugged camera that is waterproof (maximum depth: approx. 40 feet) and shockproof. The camera offers a 16MP sensor and a 5x zoom lens with 28mm wide-angle and 140mm tele settings (35mm film equivalent). It is the follower of the WG-1 and shows some improvements in image resolution and configuration. Its unique body design is indicative of the “tough camera” class and is designed for use by photographers who want to dive or use this camera for downhill mountain biking or other “adrenaline sports.”

Pages

X