Software How To

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Shutterbug Staff  |  Aug 14, 2018  |  0 comments

Here’s a great new video from photographer Pierre T. Lambert with his best Lightroom tips and tricks that he says will make a huge difference in how you edit your images.

Shutterbug Staff  |  Mar 27, 2019  |  0 comments

Yesterday we shared a tutorial on the perils of overediting your photos. But that doesn't mean we're against photo editing, in general. In fact, we're all for it when it's done right.

Shutterbug Staff  |  Mar 15, 2019  |  0 comments

Lightroom is a great program for editing your images but it can be intimidating to some beginners. In the below video, photographer Mark Denney shares some great tips on how to edit better landscape photos in Lightroom by following his seven simple steps.

Ron Leach  |  May 12, 2017  |  0 comments

Image-editing expert Nathan Dodsen doesn’t mess around when it comes to Photoshop, and in the detailed video below he provides a comprehensive demonstration of nine retouching techniques that he says are essential for all serious photographers.

Ron Leach  |  Mar 26, 2018  |  0 comments

Here’s a quick one for those of you who’d rather be out shooting photographs than sitting behind a computer messing around with Photoshop. While we’d all prefer to get the shot in the camera, the quick video below provides nine great hacks that will speed up your workflow and deliver superb results.

John Brandon  |  Mar 01, 2010  |  1 comments

For the pro photographer, there are two possible scenarios in managing a photographic workflow. One is the scattershot method, the second approach features a clear organizational method.

John Brandon  |  Jul 05, 2012  |  First Published: Jun 01, 2012  |  4 comments

With each successive release of ACDSee Pro, the photo management suite adds ever-more-powerful features. In this review I hope to help you decide whether or not its features match up with your own workflow, meet your needs, or even improve on existing features to enhance your photographic creations.

 

In my own workflow, the new version, ACDSee Pro 5, smoothed over a few rough edges in the editing process and made my management chores a bit less time-consuming. The release is not so groundbreaking that it might make you consider abandoning Adobe Lightroom or Apple Aperture altogether, but there are some pro-level additions that are definitely worth considering. The program never crashed and operated quickly for just about any task on a standard desktop PC. Note I said PC—there is no Mac version available or considered at this point.

Ron Leach  |  Jun 09, 2017  |  0 comments

Photographs often have more depth and drama when there are shadows in the scene, but unfortunately the light doesn’t always cooperate. In the quick video below you’ll learn how to use Photoshop to create and manipulate a shadow so it appears totally real. 

Ron Leach  |  Aug 08, 2017  |  0 comments

Are you looking for a way to add a little pizzazz to landscape photos and bring them to life? The simple Photoshop technique in the video below will add a 3D-like effect with motion to your images.

Ron Leach  |  Aug 24, 2017  |  0 comments

Image-editing expert Unmesh Dinda is one of our favorite sources for in-depth Photoshop and Lightroom tutorials, and in the video below he demonstrates a rather amazing technique for adding realistic water reflections to landscape photographs.

The Editors  |  Feb 27, 2001  |  4 comments

Improvements in capabilities and ease of use make the most popular pro image-editing program even better

Adobe Photoshop was introduced 11 years ago this month, and it's been the photo-editing tool of choice for most serious photographers and desktop-publishing professionals ever since. Does that make it the right one for you? Well, if you're serious about digital...

John Brandon  |  Mar 12, 2012  |  First Published: Feb 01, 2012  |  1 comments

Adobe Photoshop Elements 10 caters to the entry-level crowd, but is imbued with several professional-level tools. Even when a feature is not really intended for serious photographers, there is a goldmine of functionality that could save countless hours. The app is celebrating 10 years on the market. Adobe has slowly revised the workflow, and it’s getting much better.

 

In this version, you’ll first see a start-up screen with two buttons, one for organizing photos and one for editing. It makes more sense to click the button to organize images first, especially if you’re not even sure which images need editing.

When you do, one of the first prompts you’ll see asks how you normally import photos. That’s handy, because even the most experienced pro has to get photos off the camera somehow. You might typically load images onto a network drive, or prefer loading directly off the camera. (An option to scan images seems woefully dated these days.) Whatever option you choose, you can always go back and select a different import default. For now, it just means, when you start Elements 10, the app will automatically look for that specific source.

Jon Canfield  |  Aug 09, 2011  |  First Published: Jul 01, 2011  |  1 comments

Mention digital image editing and it’s likely that the first word you’ll hear is Photoshop. It’s become a general term, like Xerox. For many, the full-blown version of Photoshop (currently at CS5) is either overkill, with features that you’ll never need or use, or just too expensive. Adobe realizes this and has produced a more streamlined version for years. This “entry-level” version of Photoshop, named Elements, is priced like a basic editing program, but filled with features you’d expect to pay quite a bit more for. The latest version, Elements 9 has added several new features that photographers have been requesting for years, making this release an even more attractive option, and further blurring the line between CS and Elements features.

What’s New
There are normally a couple of new features in each release that make upgrading an attractive option for current users, and in this regard Elements 9 adds some interesting items in the sharing area, and a major feature that has been requested for years. Let’s take a look at what is new in Version 9.

Jack Neubart  |  Jul 07, 2015  |  0 comments

Lightroom has been always available as retail standalone software that you buy, install, update, and pay to upgrade when applicable. Well, that has changed, in part, thanks to the Adobe Creative Cloud, which unleashed a torrent of cloud-integrated apps, among them Lightroom CC.

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