Software How To

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Ron Leach  |  Aug 07, 2017  |  0 comments

We regularly turn to image-editing expert Nathaniel Dodson for quick tutorials that unlock Photoshop’s hidden secrets. In the five-minute video below you’ll learn about the “hidden Banana Tool” and four other tricks you never knew you needed when editing images.

Ron Leach  |  Nov 16, 2017  |  0 comments

Do you fully understand the difference between the Saturation and Vibrance tools that are common to most image-editing programs? Many photographers use both when processing images, and while they are quite similar, there are also important differences.

Shutterbug Staff  |  Dec 19, 2018  |  1 comments

There’s a big difference between a good portrait and a great portrait. Part of taking your portrait photography to the next level is adding some depth and pop to your photos, so they don’t look flat.

Shutterbug Staff  |  Apr 15, 2019  |  0 comments

Los Angeles-based boudoir photographer Michael Sasser is here to dispel a myth. While it's certainly not ideal, you can shoot flattering portraits in harsh sunlight.

Ron Leach  |  Sep 01, 2017  |  0 comments

French landscape photographer Serge Ramelli has a unique knack for capturing gorgeous images and making them even more spectacular with a bit of judicious editing. In this tutorial he demonstrates how replace a boring sky in Photoshop.

Ron Leach  |  Aug 24, 2018  |  0 comments

French photographer Serge Ramelli is known for spectacular landscape images. Yet, despite his mad skills, every so often Mother Nature needs some help because of poor light, pale skies, or weak colors. In this tutorial, Ramelli provides 27 free Photoshop presets, and demonstrates how to use them, so you can turn good photos into great ones.

Ron Leach  |  Dec 26, 2018  |  0 comments

Shooting during the winter can be a mixed bag: Sometime you’re presented with a sparkling winter wonderland, while other times you confront drab scenes with boring gray clouds. In this tutorial you’ll learn how to add snow to a winter image using special Photoshop brushes you can download for free.

George Schaub  |  Sep 05, 2012  |  First Published: Aug 01, 2012  |  0 comments

The question is—does anybody really know what a given image would look like if they shot it on Kodachrome 25, or Fuji Acros, or some obscure color negative film that even in film’s heyday was little used or appreciated? Perhaps the more pertinent question is—how many people have made photographs using film? But film references are what a number of so-called film emulation software programs use for describing presets that can be applied to a digital image. Half academic and half nostalgic, the programs use film brand names to describe saturation, contrast, color nuance, and grain structure variations that are then applied to an image. Perhaps using film names is better than poetic fantasy terms, like “misty blue dawn,” but then again entirely subjective descriptors, rather than supposedly clinical ones used in these software programs, might be just as handy for today’s photography crowd. In any case, I recently tested one such program, DxO’s FilmPack 3.1, to see if it offered up creative variations that could be used as is or as foundation images when interpreting subjects and scenes.

 

Jack Neubart  |  Jul 19, 2012  |  First Published: Jun 01, 2012  |  3 comments

DxO Optics Pro Version 7 is a Raw converter for Mac and Microsoft Windows with some nifty tricks up its sleeve. It offers its own brand of nondestructive image editing, with tonal, exposure, geometric, and optical corrections that make it stand apart from the crowd. As was true of Version 6.6, Optics Pro 7 supports the company’s new FilmPack 3 film emulator plug-in (see sidebar below). We will have a more complete review of the film emulator in a future issue.

 

Optics Pro Version 7 is a dramatic departure from earlier releases. The Select pane is gone, so you no longer have to deal with tedious Projects (unless you want to). Now you go straight to work after opening a folder. Double-click on an image and that takes you right to the nondestructive editing phase, in Customize. Beyond this point the Mac and Windows versions part ways in one key respect: the Windows version runs faster than the Mac version, which continues to be laborious.

Jack Neubart  |  Dec 12, 2014  |  0 comments

I’ve worked with DxO's OpticsPro imaging software for several years and have watched this program evolve and make great strides as a Raw image converter. What the new DxO OpticsPro 10 version of the software brings to the table is a cadre of new features and improvements. But are these enough to catapult this software into the top tier, or is it still playing catch-up?

Ron Leach  |  Jun 06, 2018  |  0 comments

Ever since DxO acquired the popular Nik Collection of image-editing software from Google last October, photographers have eagerly awaited an update to the powerful free suite of Photoshop and Lightroom plugins. The good news is that Nik Collection 2018 is now available on the DxO website, although the download is no longer free.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Sep 25, 2014  |  0 comments

Adobe announced Photoshop Elements 13 and Premiere Elements 13. Both have cool new features. If you’re a user of version 12, should you upgrade? The answer is: it all depends. Here’s the advice I give my friends.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Feb 05, 2015  |  0 comments

Wouldn’t it be great if you could resize a batch of images simply by right-clicking them and selecting their new dimensions from a menu? Windows users now can—even on 64-bit machines running Windows 8.1.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Sep 04, 2014  |  0 comments

Last month readers enjoyed our Easy Photo Tip that explained how to zoom during exposure to create an exciting special effect. But a few readers had trouble mastering the technique. Here’s a way to achieve nearly the same results using Photoshop Elements 12.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Aug 22, 2014  |  0 comments

Many features of Photoshop Elements can be customized to suit your liking. Surprisingly, some experienced users overlook this powerful capability. A great place to start is at the Preferences menu. This screen shot is from the Mac version, but the same concept applies to Win as well as full-blown Photoshop products.

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