Wedding Photography How To

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Ron Leach  |  May 11, 2017  |  0 comments

We’ve all been there: Your best friend begs you to shoot his wedding in exchange for a case of cheap beer because he’s “really short on cash.” And no matter how much you protest that you’re a wildlife photographer and have never shot a wedding, the response is “I’m sure you’ll do great."

Ron Leach  |  Aug 15, 2016  |  0 comments

Canadians Cici and Clement were not only serious about each other, but they were so serious about their wedding photos that they hired Life Studios, Inc. of Vancouver to join them in Iceland to document the nuptials. And the resulting images are breathtaking.

Ron Leach  |  Sep 20, 2017  |  0 comments

Photo enthusiasts tend to have a love-hate relationship with camera settings when viewing an epic photo. Some are more concerned with the backstory and artistic details of a shot, while others seem obsessed with the arcane minutiae of every camera setting used to make the image.

Dan Havlik  |  Dec 15, 2017  |  0 comments

We teamed up with veteran wedding photographer Denis Reggie for our new Experience the Power of Canon site to learn his tips on an often tricky subject: how to capture formal group portraits at a wedding.

Joe Farace  |  Mar 14, 2017  |  0 comments

The late Mr. Newton was certainly onto something. I believe the overwhelming desire of most portrait photographers is to please the client, with seduction, amusement, and entertainment far from their minds. Let me submit this idea: shoot what the client says they want and then shoot something challenging their assumptions. Most wedding clients tend to be traditional but even introducing black and white or infrared images can increase sales and show clients you’re thinking outside the veil.

Ron Leach  |  Oct 31, 2017  |  0 comments

Yesterday we demonstrated how to make better outdoor portraits by balancing ambient light with flash. Today’s lighting tutorial takes a different approach, explaining how to shoot indoor group portraits with a simple on-camera flash technique.

Clay Blackmore  |  Jul 31, 2013  |  2 comments

Photographing couples is an art form that should not be underestimated. Finding the right way to get two people, no matter how wellthey know each other, to pose and stay in a position worth shooting can be extremely difficult. Success requires the right combination of clear communication and dexterous shooting ability. That’s why it is so crucial for portrait and wedding photographers to follow a clear system in order to have time to both shoot classically-posed shots and fun, candid photos.

Lynne Eodice  |  Aug 01, 2003  |  0 comments

All photos by Meg Smith

 

Meg Smith's wedding photography goes beyond the typically posed portraits--she has a gift for capturing special, intimate moments throughout the event, resulting in some very memorable images. Her attitude, which translates to her images is, "Weddings are fun--they're celebrations!" During the eight years...

Ron Leach  |  Jun 13, 2016  |  0 comments

Sooner or later most photographers will receive the dreaded question: “Would you mind shooting our wedding?” If you’ve never taken on this daylong assignment, you may not realize how important and challenging it is. Be sure to watch this video before saying “yes.”

Ron Leach  |  Jan 26, 2018  |  0 comments

When it comes to great portrait and wedding photographers, California pro Bambi Cantrell is near the top of everyone’s list. In the tutorial below, she provides three powerful tips for making stunning photos of your own.

Jack Neubart  |  Aug 03, 2012  |  First Published: Jun 01, 2012  |  1 comments

“My dad won a Nikon FM at a company-sponsored event when I was 12, and, the moment he handed the camera over to me, it was love at first sight,” Nels Akerlund recalls. Six months later, he’d built a darkroom in his basement and that love affair with photography has not abated. It carried him through the Rochester Institute of Technology, an internship with a White House photographer in the Reagan administration, and assignments for the National Geographic Society, The New York Times, and photo shoots worldwide. He shares this passion with his wife Anna, who is also his business partner and fellow shooter. Aside from weddings, Akerlund shoots architecture, food, small products, and of course portraits in his studio and on location. He and his wife operate a spacious, two-story, 2000-square-foot studio behind their home in Rockford, Illinois.

Steve Bedell  |  May 06, 2014  |  First Published: Mar 01, 2014  |  0 comments

Mention the name Jerry Ghionis to any wedding photographer and you will immediately see respect and admiration in their eyes. Jerry shot to prominence by winning the International Wedding Album of the Year Award at Wedding Portrait Photographers International (WPPI) a record eight times and was also named by WPPI as one of the top five wedding photographers in the world. With a style that combines fashion, portraiture, and spontaneity, his work is instantly recognizable. Sought after by wedding clients from around the world, Jerry has expanded his base to become a wildly popular teacher and lecturer and now even a product developer. I even hear he does a mean karaoke but I’ve yet to witness that!

Mike Stensvold  |  Apr 01, 2004  |  0 comments
Spring is the season of rebirth and renewal—hence, the ritual of spring cleaning. It's also a season of contrasts: there's still snow in the high elevations, while the lower regions come into bloom; and there are hot summery spells and cold wintry spells interspersed with milder days. So in most areas, you can shoot "winter" shots and "summer" shots in thespring...
Maria Piscopo  |  Apr 21, 2015  |  0 comments

Today’s wedding photography business uses many different self-promotional tools ranging from traditional bridal shows to social media advertising. No one photographer has the “right” way to run a wedding business; each photographer’s targeted wedding clientele, their individual photography style and business plan will dictate how differently they market and find clients.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Mar 11, 2017  |  0 comments

So while many wedding photographers react to a situation to capture the beauty they might see, Scott Robert, as he’s known in the industry, feels that as a photographer who’s charging $10,000 or more, he’s got to knock it out of the park every single time, no matter what. So he became a director of brides, grooms, and situations.

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