Medium Format Camera News

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Dan Havlik  |  Sep 09, 2014  |  0 comments

Hasselblad has just announced a brand new medium format camera body: the Hasselblad H5X. The new H5X has been introduced, primarily, as an upgrade for photographers who use the older H1, H2, H2F and H4X but may now want the H5’s upgraded capability, Hasselblad said in making the announcement. The company also forsees the H5X being used as a backup body for photographers who already own the H5D.

Dan Havlik  |  Sep 08, 2014  |  0 comments

A venerable brand in medium format photography has announced a long-awaited new system: the new 50-megapixel, CMOS sensor-based Leaf Credo 50. The Leaf Credo 50 was unveiled by Mamiya Leaf this morning, 14 years after the CMOS-based 6MP Leaf C-MOST digital back was announced at photokina 2000.

George Schaub  |  Aug 29, 2014  |  0 comments

The Technical Image Press Association (TIPA) member magazines recently convened for their General Assembly to vote for the best photo and imaging products launched by the industry in the last 12 months. The voting took place during the General Assembly that was held in spring, 2014, in Vancouver, Canada.

Dan Havlik  |  Aug 12, 2014  |  0 comments

If you've wanted to make the leap from 35mm full-frame digital photography to medium-format, the start-up costs just got a whole lot cheaper.

Dan Havlik  |  Aug 04, 2014  |  0 comments

Pentax's parent company Ricoh Imaging just announced some product news big and small: a whopping 28-45mm F/4.5 lens for its 645Z medium format camera system; and a tiny, retro-style Q-S1 mirrorless compact system camera.

Dan Havlik  |  Jul 21, 2014  |  0 comments

Hasselblad's gone "back to the future" with a new digital back designed to bring its V System analog cameras into the 21st Century. Called the CFV-50c, the CMOS sensor-based back will sell for 11,000 Euros (approximately $14,900) and is designed to work with "almost every V camera made by the company since 1957," Hasselblad said

Fritz Takeda  |  Nov 13, 2012  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2012  |  1 comments

Once upon a time a camera wasn’t just a consumer electronic mediocrity but a gem in a show window reflecting brilliant illumination from its matte chromium skin. Such were the products on display at the 34th annual Tokyo Used Camera Show, which ran in the exhibition hall of Matsuya department store late this winter. Unlike many department stores in the US, Japanese department stores are premium boutiques of selected goods, usually with a big exhibition space as a traffic generator.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Sep 18, 2012  |  First Published: Aug 01, 2012  |  4 comments

Every year the Technical Image Press Association (TIPA), a worldwide association of photo and imaging magazine editors, meets to pick the Best of Class in a wide range of photo categories. As the sole US member of the association, Shutterbug joins editors from Europe, Asia, and Africa in the nominating, judging, and selection process. One of the most exciting aspects of photography today is the constant advancement of technology and design, and this year’s Top Products reflect that spirit and those accomplishments, including new categories of Video D-SLR and Mobile App. Editor George Schaub joins all fellow TIPA members in congratulating those selected to receive the prestigious TIPA award. (To learn more about TIPA, please visit the website at:

Christopher Dack  |  Aug 28, 2012  |  First Published: Jul 01, 2012  |  1 comments

Recent years have seen staggering innovations in cameras, most notably involving ISO speed, sensor size in compacts, and video capabilities. Despite these advances, however, one thing has divided the industry for more than 10 years but has rarely been talked about—that is, until recently—optical low-pass filters. Many cameras include them, but some do not. There are believers in both camps but the only thing that’s clear is that the issue is far from decided.

Jack Neubart  |  Jan 23, 2012  |  First Published: Dec 01, 2011  |  0 comments

It isn’t often that as a camera reviewer you get the chance to test a camera with the technical experts right at hand, but that’s how I got to know the Phase One 645DF and IQ160 back. Actually, I attended one of the company’s Phase One Digital Artists Series workshops in Chicago with other photographers (see PODAS workshops sidebar for further info on this and other workshops the company is offering). Beyond the guided portion of the workshop, we were given time to go off and work with the camera at our own pace. It didn’t take long to find my comfort zone with the new IQ system. By the end of day one, I had a working familiarity with the camera and back and hardly paid attention to the big bundle I was hefting. Although I often felt quite at ease shooting handheld, for night photography and some other occasions I did employ my trusty Benbo tripod, with the camera seated on a Foba Superball M-2 on one day, an Acratech GP-L ball head on another.

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz  |  Jan 01, 2011  |  1 comments

The weirdest camera at the show, the GFAE, wasn’t even recognizable as a camera, not least because it was a view camera with the bellows left out in order to show its construction more clearly. We’ll come back to it later, but first, let’s look at some more conventional offerings.

George Schaub  |  Jan 01, 2011  |  0 comments

Our show report this year is an amalgam of product news and trend spotting, which pretty much reflects what photokina has stood for in our minds. The sense of a United Nations of photography still prevails at this increasingly European-directed show, but the image and its uses is still the universal tie that binds.