Lens News

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Shutterbug Staff  |  Sep 13, 2018  |  0 comments

Yesterday, we posted our new video featuring Shutterbug photographer Jordan Matter who explained three reasons why he thinks you need to get a telephoto zoom lens now. And then, lo and behold, popular photography vlogger Peter McKinnon just posted his own video on why he thinks every photographer needs a telephoto lens.

Steve Bedell  |  Aug 01, 2009  |  0 comments

“Most pro lenses have much sturdier construction than their consumer counterparts.”

 

I’m a pro photographer and have been for about 30 years. I mostly shoot portraits and a few weddings. I’m not one of those guys who will be first in line for the latest 15-800mm f/1.2 lens. As a matter of fact, I’m pretty much an equipment minimalist. But when I need a lens, I...

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Mar 03, 2016  |  0 comments

An aperture set at f/2 is twice as big as one set at f/2.8 and four times larger than f/4. What’s Pi got to do with f/stops, and why do we use such a seemingly arbitrary numbering system? Continue reading to learn the answers to these and a few more arcane aperture facts. 

Dan Havlik  |  Jul 23, 2018  |  0 comments

Don’t believe it when tell people tell you it’s wrong to shoot portraits with a wide-angle lens. If you know what you’re doing, your results can be eye-catching and super modern-looking.

Joe Farace  |  Mar 02, 2018  |  0 comments

When shopping for a wide-angle lens, presented for your approval, is a collection of our favorite (mostly) zoom lenses to expand your view of the world.

Patrick Sweeney  |  Apr 11, 2016  |  0 comments

Sometimes you want to capture expansive vistas without resorting to post-capture tricks like stitching multiple frames together; like on my latest excursion to Antarctica when I wanted a wider perspective than I achieved on an earlier visit with a 24mm lens (which transformed into a 38mm on my crop-body camera). The question I asked myself was ”how wide is “wide enough?”

Steve Bedell  |  Sep 14, 2011  |  First Published: Aug 01, 2011  |  0 comments

I really like extreme lenses. Extremely wide, extremely fast, and extremely long lenses will all allow you to create unique images that stand out from the crowd. When I heard about the Sigma 8-16mm lens I wanted to get my hands on one and start shooting, so I asked my editor if I could borrow one from Sigma for testing. He wanted to know what I was going to do with it, so naturally I told him: take portraits. You might, as he did, find this a little odd—taking portraits with a wide-angle lens, and a very wide lens at that. After all, don’t photographers usually use long lenses for portraits?

 

Why are photographers taught to use long lenses for portraits? There are four basic tenets behind this reasoning: narrow angle of view, shallow depth of field, flattering perspective, and a comfortable working distance between you and your subject. However, flip these “rules” on their head and you’ll see why I like working with wides: wide angle of view, great potential depth of field, unique perspective, and, oddly enough, working right in your subject’s face. In short, I use the special nature of a wide lens to give my portraits a new and unique look.

The Editors  |  Mar 31, 2015  |  0 comments

Have you shot some great photos? Well, now’s the time to enter them in our brand new photo contest where you’ll have the chance to win two amazing prizes!

Ron Leach  |  Jul 06, 2017  |  0 comments

If you stumbled upon a rare Novoflex 600mm pistol grip “bazooka lens” at a yard sale for $17, we imagine you’d lay down your cash, grab the case, and quickly head for your car. That’s exactly what our weird lens guru Mathieu Stern did recently in Paris.

Shutterbug Staff  |  Dec 10, 2018  |  0 comments

You’ve probably heard this one before: you should shoot portraits with mid-range lenses like an 85mm or an 100mm to create the most flattering look. Or this one: don’t shoot a portrait with a wide-angle lens because it will make a person’s face look distorted.

Roger W. Hicks  |  Aug 01, 2007  |  0 comments

"My" Leica M8--a loaner from Leica for review--came with a 50mm f/2 bar-coded Summicron. The 18x27mm sensor turns this into a 67mm lens in 35mm terms: rather long for someone whose standard lens on 35mm has for decades been a 35mm. So as soon as I got the M8, I started using other, older lenses. There is, after all, an enormous choice, from 12mm (18mm...

The Editors  |  Jul 06, 2015  |  6 comments

Nature photography has long captured the hearts and minds of amateur and professional photographers dedicated to capturing images of the great outdoors. Whether your passion is wildlife, landscape, or macro photography, we’d love to see examples of your best work.

Ron Leach  |  Sep 08, 2016  |  1 comments

Zeiss has just added three fast prime lenses to their Milvus line of premium manual-focus lenses for DSLR cameras—a 15mm f/2.8, an 18mm f/2.8 and a 135mm f/2 telephoto. This expands the respected Milvus line to nine lenses offering optimum image characteristics, premium coatings, smooth bokeh, and uncompromising build quality.

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz  |  Aug 01, 2006  |  0 comments

As we said in the review of the new Zeiss Ikon (ZI) 35mm rangefinder (April 2006 issue of Shutterbug or online at www.shutterbug.com), we received six of the seven Zeiss ZM-mount lenses announced at photokina 2004: 15mm f/2.8, 21mm f/2.8, 25mm f/2.8, 28mm f/2.8, 35mm f/2, and 50mm f/2. The 85mm f/2 (listing at $2759, plus $127 for the lens shade) still wasn't available as we...

Cynthia Boylan  |  Sep 10, 2015  |  0 comments

Zeiss has introduced a new line of six high performance lenses designed for high-resolution DSLR cameras from Nikon and Canon.

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