Outdoor Photography How To

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Henry Anderson  |  Mar 18, 2020  |  0 comments

Here's a provocative and enlightening video from photographer Mark Denney. In the below clip, Denney discusses whether photographers should remove elements from a landscape photo during the editing process.

The Editors  |  Feb 01, 2005  |  0 comments

Good photographs needn't be complicated.

You can often make better pictures by thinking "simple."

Instead of trying to get as much as possible into the shot, try to include as little as possible. Ideally, you should include everything that adds to the picture, and nothing else. But that's a tall order for those new to photography...

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Aug 25, 2015  |  0 comments

The temperature was 19 degrees on a late February morning last winter on the beach at Nantucket, Massachusetts. About 300 yards out the ocean was icing up, and the waves rolling in had the consistency of freshly mixed concrete. Checking things out was pro photographer Jonathan Nimerfroh.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Jan 24, 2017  |  0 comments

Heading home on New Year’s Day after dropping off a family friend at the bus station, Peter Baumgarten runs into a blinding snowstorm. “Whiteout conditions,” he says, “almost impossible to see 10 feet in front of me, trying to make out car tracks to follow, but they’re completely covered.” After about 20 minutes of anxious struggle through blinding snow, he’s had enough, and he pulls over near a little park in the small town he and his wife, Christianna, are trying to drive through. With a sigh of relief, he lets the stress dissipate.

Ron Leach  |  Nov 29, 2016  |  0 comments

San Francisco-based filmmaker Kevin Wolf is lighting up the Internet because of a simple trick he employed to turn a good photograph into a great one: He simply flipped the image upside down.

Shutterbug Staff  |  Mar 09, 2018  |  0 comments

While visiting Pétarel Lake in the French Alps, Shutterbug reader Michael Arzur captured a glorious sunset thanks to preplanning and a bit of luck.

Mike Stensvold  |  Apr 01, 2004  |  0 comments
Spring is the season of rebirth and renewal—hence, the ritual of spring cleaning. It's also a season of contrasts: there's still snow in the high elevations, while the lower regions come into bloom; and there are hot summery spells and cold wintry spells interspersed with milder days. So in most areas, you can shoot "winter" shots and "summer" shots in thespring...
Lynne Eodice  |  Aug 01, 2003  |  0 comments

All photos by David Schultz

 

According to nature photographer David Schultz, "Spring and Fall are my busy times for picture-taking." Aspen and maple trees adorned in fall colors are big sellers at West Light Images, Schultz' photo gallery located in Park City, Utah. People also enjoy decorating their walls with spring wildflowers, he observes.

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Barry Tanenbaum  |  Sep 09, 2014  |  0 comments

Mark Alberhasky, for one. Put him in a great situation where he can take very cool photographs and he’ll nail them nine times out of 10. Chances are, though, that won’t be enough. Just because the photos he’s making look good doesn’t mean he won’t be thinking about what he can do to create even better ones. You can attribute that drive to several factors, one of which is his early realization that if he took a straightforward photo of what everyone else was seeing, no matter how good a photo it was, it would be just that: what everyone else was seeing. The goal was to come up with his own ideas and add them to the creative process, and many of Mark’s photos are the result of taking that e

Ron Leach  |  Oct 14, 2016  |  0 comments

Mike Olbinski is an Arizona-based portrait/wedding photographer with a unique resume. In addition to his more sublime work, he’s also a serious storm chaser and captured the thrilling time lapse video below.

Moose Peterson  |  Jun 13, 2013  |  1 comments

Some of the best photography is in the worst weather!” I’ve been saying that for decades and it comes from coming in from the cold, soaking wet and thrilled to death with the images I captured. The drama in the light, clouds and the response to it by nature is a once-in-a-lifetime spectacle you just can’t duplicate. In order to see it and photograph it, you have to get out in it and be able to work. And that’s where the challenge lies.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Nov 25, 2014  |  0 comments

“Photography is always a bit random in the UK because the weather is so changeable,” Martin Turner says. When he and his friends arrived late in the afternoon at the Weston-super-Mare seaside resort in North Somerset, they were greeted by “absolute, gorgeous sunshine.” Which lasted about 45 minutes. “All of a sudden the sky went black,” Turner says, “and we had to stand underneath the pier whilst it chucked down rain for quite a while.” Then the clouds broke, and at about 8:00 in the evening he was able to capture this sunset image.

Ron Leach  |  Oct 10, 2017  |  0 comments

Sooner or later every avid street photographer makes a simple but important realization: If you always point your lens straight ahead, you’re missing out on a whole realm of dramatic angles and interesting compositional opportunities.

Ron Leach  |  Jan 17, 2018  |  0 comments

Yesterday we featured an eye-opening tutorial that explained how to be a better street shooter by overcoming a fear of photographing strangers. And today’s follow-up offers some great insight into the work of an iconic street shooter who once said “Street photography is a stupid term. 

Lynne Eodice  |  Oct 01, 2004  |  1 comments

Autumn is a season of change, accompanied by colorful foliage, pumpkin patches, and costumed children decked out for Halloween. Days become shorter and the sun is positioned lower in the southern sky, creating warmer light than in the summer months.

If you want to photograph fall colors, find out when the peak time will be.

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