Photo How To

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Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Dec 21, 2017  |  2 comments

Sometimes it’s better to be lucky than smart. For me, luck means getting a decent picture even though I use precisely the wrong settings, or when I use exactly the wrong equipment for the situation. Yep, I admit that I benefit from luck a lot. 

Ron Leach  |  Dec 21, 2017  |  0 comments

It’s not often that one has an opportunity to glean wisdom from six of the world’s top photographers, but that’s exactly what you’ll find in the eye-opening video below. In just six minutes, you’ll pick up 13 composition tips that will definitely improve your photography.

Ron Leach  |  Dec 20, 2017  |  0 comments

It’s amazing how cityscapes that appear drab during the day are transformed into sparkling scenes at night—just begging to be photographed. And this time of the year, when festive holiday lights often adorn the urban landscape, nighttime photography in the city can be more interesting than ever.

Scott Kelby  |  Dec 20, 2017  |  1 comments

Q. The idea of shooting in Raw on your DSLR and then importing those Raw images into your tablet or phone to edit is pretty ludicrous to me. I don’t know of anyone who has enough free space on their mobile phone to edit even a day’s worth of vacation shooting. Are people really buying into this?

Ron Leach  |  Dec 20, 2017  |  0 comments

How often have you captured what you thought was a great photograph, only to learn later that your “money shot” was soft and destined for the trash? We all miss focus on occasion, especially in low light, but the quick video below will help you keep those mistakes to a minimum.

Ron Leach  |  Dec 19, 2017  |  0 comments

There’s been a growing trend among digital photographers to use vintage lenses on modern mirrorless cameras. Why would you want to do that? Among other reasons is that old manual focus lenses often sell for a fraction of the cost of their current autofocus counterparts, and the necessary adapters are both abundant and affordable.

Ron Leach  |  Dec 14, 2017  |  0 comments

If there’s one bit of advice we’ve all heard a million times, it’s “Be sure and use a tripod.” Yet, despite the fact that sharp images are the goal of just about everyone, it’s sort of amazing how many times photographers “forget” to bring along a tripod.

Seth Shostak  |  Dec 14, 2017  |  0 comments

Remember f-stops? Not everyone does. Millennials shoot their selfies with automated smartphones that have sent f-stops to steampunk heaven. Old-timers who began with box cameras were spared the fear factor of f-stops until later in life, and may never have fully adjusted to these adjustments.

Ron Leach  |  Dec 13, 2017  |  0 comments

We’ve said this before, but it bears repeating: Nighttime is the right time for capturing unique images. In the four-minute video below, you’ll take a photo walk after dark with Polish-born photographer Marcin Lewandowski, and pick up some inspiration along the way.

Ron Leach  |  Dec 13, 2017  |  0 comments

Achieving a correct exposure is the first step toward capturing a great image, and on Monday we explained how to do that by bracketing your shots. In today’s tutorial, you’ll learn another way to get things right, by using your camera’s histogram.

Ron Leach  |  Dec 12, 2017  |  0 comments

The autofocus system in a modern DSLR camera is truly a wonder of technology. And there’s a lot going on under the hood that you may not totally understand. But fear not, because the quick video below explains everything you need to know to achieve optimum results.

Ron Leach  |  Dec 11, 2017  |  0 comments

One way to make sure you nail a perfectly exposed image under difficult lighting conditions is to bracket shots by making what you think is a “correct” exposure, followed by a few more that are incrementally lighter and darker. As you’ll see in the four-minute video below, there’s a bit more to precise bracketing than you may think.

Ron Leach  |  Dec 08, 2017  |  0 comments

You’ve probably heard the term “lens diffraction” to describe how image sharpness suffers as you use smaller and smaller aperture settings. While depth of field increases as you stop down a lens, the amount of fine detail a lens can resolve decreases at smaller f/stops.

Ron Leach  |  Dec 05, 2017  |  0 comments

Let’s say you want to try your hand at close-up photography, but you can’t afford an expensive macro lens. Or maybe you’re not short of cash, but you don’t plan on doing enough macro work to justify the investment. 

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