Photo How To

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Mike Stensvold  |  Nov 01, 2005  |  2 comments

Close-up photography--taking pictures at very close range--can provide a different outlook on everyday things, reveal details unseen by the naked eye, and turn common objects into intriguing abstract images.

The traditional ways to do close-up photography involves special gear: Simple close-up diopter lenses are inexpensive but reduce sharpness noticeably...

Text and photography by Mike Stensvold  |  Jun 01, 2005  |  First Published: Jan 01, 2005  |  0 comments

Long lenses are wonderful photographic tools. Their longer-than-"normal" focal lengths magnify everything, allowing you to get "close-ups" of subjects you can't (or don't want to) approach closely. The shorter long lenses (those in the 85--120mm range, for 35mm cameras) are ideal for portraits, because they produce a good head size at a...

Lynne Eodice  |  Mar 01, 2005  |  0 comments

Color often establishes the mood of a photograph, whether it's bold or subdued. Green is cool and refreshing, while red on the other hand, is fiery and passionate.

 

If you want to emphasize a particular color in a picture, keep in mind that some of the most pleasing color photos are ones in which one color or a group of closely related hues...

The Editors  |  Feb 01, 2005  |  0 comments

Good photographs needn't be complicated.

You can often make better pictures by thinking "simple."

Instead of trying to get as much as possible into the shot, try to include as little as possible. Ideally, you should include everything that adds to the picture, and nothing else. But that's a tall order for those new to photography...

Lynne Eodice  |  Feb 01, 2005  |  0 comments

When you view a smooth, shiny surface from the proper angle--such as glass, metal or water--you'll see a reflected image. These reflections provide you with a great opportunity to add interest to a photo by showing two different aspects of the environment at the same time. Since the reflected portion of the image is almost always distorted, it often lends a surreal...

The Editors  |  Jan 01, 2005  |  1 comments

Photography is one of those things you learn best by doing it. Here are some photo projects that will help you get more out of your photography.

 

1. Decorate Your Home with Your Photos
Considering all the time, effort and money you put into making your photographs, you should display the best ones for all to see. A good place to start is in your own...

Lynne Eodice  |  Jun 01, 2004  |  0 comments

If you're intrigued by architecture and its interesting details, chances are that you enjoy photographing stairways. You can capture interesting design elements, both in structure and in detail. Stairways can be depicted in their entirety with curved, sweeping lines, or can become an abstract subject if you zoom in on a close-up of...

Mike Stensvold  |  Feb 01, 2004  |  1 comments

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next to your camera body, the lenses you use with it are your most important photographic purchases. While physically, a lens is just a collection of glass or plastic elements held precisely in position in a light-tight tube, with a camera mount on one end and some means of focusing, creatively it's your...

Lynne Eodice  |  Feb 01, 2004  |  1 comments

Whether you're the proud owner of some hot new wheels, or enjoy shooting pictures at car shows, there are a few tips to keep in mind which will make your photography easier and more fun.

 

It's important to keep your camera angle in mind when...

Text and photography by Mike Stensvold  |  Jan 01, 2004  |  2 comments

There are lots of special-effects accessories on camera-store shelves, and they are well worth checking out if you're into special effects. But you don't need a lot of fancy accessories to create some interesting and unusual photographic effects. In fact, if you have a basic SLR (single-lens reflex) camera—film or digital—there are several special effects you can produce with no...

Lynne Eodice  |  Jan 01, 2004  |  0 comments

 

 

 

As the subject of a photograph, texture speaks to our sense of touch. The way that things feel is very ingrained in our consciousness. Texture tells us about the nature of a subject, whether it's the rough surface of a straw hat, or the silky smoothness of satin. The light that reveals an object's texture also gives us a sense of...

The Editors  |  Dec 01, 2003  |  0 comments

As winter arrives, so do incredible photo opportunities. Photography is photography, but here are some things you should consider about shooting in wintertime.

1. Exposing Snow
Short-answer quiz: What color is snow? White, right? Well, in our mind's eye it is. In the real world, though, it can be white (in bright sun), gray or blue (in open shade), or even pink (if your...

Lynne Eodice  |  Aug 01, 2003  |  0 comments

All photos by David Schultz

 

According to nature photographer David Schultz, "Spring and Fall are my busy times for picture-taking." Aspen and maple trees adorned in fall colors are big sellers at West Light Images, Schultz' photo gallery located in Park City, Utah. People also enjoy decorating their walls with spring wildflowers, he observes.

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The Editors  |  Aug 01, 2003  |  1 comments

Sun & Games Fun with the sun...and more

1. Sun Stars
Your wide-angle lens at its smallest aperture can turn the sun into a star in your photos—fitting, since the sun actually is a star. The effect occurs because the tiny aperture diffracts the incoming light rays a lot. This diffraction causes the star effect. You can include the sun as a compositional. Photo by...

Lynne Eodice  |  Jun 01, 2003  |  0 comments

 

 

 

There are a number of ways to portray "heat" in a photograph. First of all, you can use color. Perhaps more than any other design element, color determines the mood of your pictures. You can establish the entire mood of your photo by emphasizing a particular color scheme—reds, golds, and oranges are...

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