Nature Photography How To

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Josh Miller  |  Jun 01, 2015  |  1 comments

Telephotos have always been bread-and-butter lenses for photographers shooting everything from commercial and sports to wildlife and landscapes. The ability to separate a subject against its background or pull in a distant scene has made telephoto lenses a staple in nearly every camera bag around the world.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Mar 06, 2015  |  0 comments

The Canon Digital Learning Center is now offering free tutorial videos hosted by world-renowned bird photographer Arthur Morris. Arthur demonstrates which techniques, gear and settings he uses to create artistic photos of birds and other wildlife.

Rick Sheremeta  |  Feb 27, 2015  |  0 comments

There’s no reason to pack your photo gear away when the first snows of winter start to fly. Winter photography presents some of the most wonderful opportunities to capture stunning subject matter that is not available during other times of the year. With the ground enveloped in a blanket of white snow, even familiar surroundings will take on an entirely different perspective and serve as the background for new and exciting images.

Howard Millard  |  Feb 10, 2015  |  0 comments
For over five winters, I have taken my camera and explored an Everglades-like ecosystem in South Florida teeming with great blue herons, great egrets, alligators, turtles, snakes, fish, ibis, tricolored herons, green herons, black-necked stilts, grebes, cormorants, anhingas, hawks, iguanas, and who knows what else.
Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Jan 21, 2015  |  0 comments

For centuries, scientists have labored to understand the nature of light. Some ancient Greeks believed that light was emitted from the eyeball the same way a bat sends out an echolocation chirp which allows him to determine his precise position in physical space. Understandably, there were problems with that hypothesis. Other theories followed. Those who embraced the wave theory were right—mostly. Light behaves like a wave up to a certain point. Similarly, those who professed the particle theory were also correct—partly.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Nov 11, 2014  |  0 comments

The National Wildlife Federation recently announced the winners of their 44th annual National Wildlife photo contest. Operated by National Wildlife Federation's award-winning magazine National Wildlife, the contest celebrates the beauty of nature while raising funds to help the organization protect wildlife and wild places.

Selected from more than 29,000 entries, this year’s winners include a grand prize recipient who spent years perfecting a photographic technique that resulted in a one-of-a-kind image of grey herons and another winner who was able to grab his camera just in time to capture a rare image of praying mantis nymphs hatching on his backyard deck. 

Jim Zuckerman  |  Oct 27, 2014  |  0 comments

Every photographer has a personal vision and a particular taste in composition, light, color and so on. For example, many photographers chose nature’s details simply to abstract the color and form they find. Others like to use extremely shallow depth of field—also called selective focus—so only a sliver of the subject is sharp while the rest of it is soft. People who are intrigued by the beauty, intricacy and complexity of nature usually shoot with the opposite approach. They want to reveal as much detail in the subjects as possible so those who view their work can appreciate the designs and the patterns in the images with tack sharp clarity.

Dan Havlik  |  Oct 09, 2014  |  1 comments

Ok, this should give you a good chuckle this morning. Photographer Tony Northrup has teamed up with his wife Chelsea, who's also a photographer, to create a hilarious video called “Stuff that Annoys Wildlife Photographers.”

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Sep 23, 2014  |  0 comments

(In March 1986, the Least Bell’s Vireo, a bird species that Moose Peterson had volunteered to photograph, was listed as endangered, and Moose, who was just starting out as a photographer, was about to learn the power of a single image.)

Jim Zuckerman  |  Jul 21, 2014  |  0 comments

I’m sure that everyone who has ever owned a camera has taken pictures of flowers. It’s impossible not to. Flowers are too beautiful to resist, and there are so many species and varieties that you could devote your entire life to shooting nothing but flowers and hardly scratch the surface.

Jim Zuckerman  |  Jul 21, 2014  |  0 comments

The beautiful designs and colors that can be found in the feathers of many species of birds offer wonderful photo opportunities. You can create frame-filling shots of unique patterns, and it’s also possible to make interesting arrangements of the feathers that become a unique art form unto itself.

Jim Zuckerman  |  Jul 21, 2014  |  2 comments

Photography gives us the ability to freeze moments in time that are impossible for the human eye to see. The collision of a drop of water with a pool of water is an event that is intriguing to see, and without the aid of a camera and flash it would be impossible to study, appreciate and admire.

Jeff Howe  |  Jul 18, 2014  |  First Published: Jun 01, 2014  |  0 comments

Last year, I decided to take on a challenge focusing on the unique natural beauty associated with wildfires in a Florida scrub ecosystem, one of the most rare ecosystems in the state. Florida is no stranger to wildfires. Nationwide, Florida has the second highest number of wildfires annually. In 2011, it was estimated that 300,000 acres of land was burned due to over 4800 wildfires. My project was centered at Indrio Savannahs Preserve, where a 120-acre wildfire was ignited by lightning in March of 2013.

Jim Zuckerman  |  Jun 20, 2014  |  0 comments

Most people find the bones of animals fascinating. Nature photographers are usually drawn to them like a magnet, and when they are in a particularly beautiful environment, they make captivating subjects. Too often, though, bones are scattered in an unattractive way or they are laying in dirt or underbrush that isn’t especially appealing. In that case, it’s a simple matter of arranging the various elements so they are more pleasing.

Jim Zuckerman  |  Jun 20, 2014  |  1 comments

There are various ways that you can use to focus very close to small subjects. Here is a list of choices.

 

Macro Lenses. You can purchase a lens that is specifically designed to focus closely. These are called “macro” lenses, and they are available in focal lengths between 50mm and 200mm (figure A). They can also focus to infinity so you can use them for landscapes, portraits, etc., but photographers buy them primarily to use in close-up work.

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