Photo Accessory Reviews

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Joe Farace  |  Aug 26, 2014  |  0 comments

The most important tip I would like to share about travel photography is never buy a new camera or lens before traveling to Bhutan or even Carhenge. The next most essential travel photography secret is that using your equipment has to be instinctive; when a photo op presents itself you may only have a few seconds to get a shot. There’s no time to think about what menu to use or how to turn on continuous AF, or what exposure mode you’re in. Using your camera has to be instinctive; you should see—or even anticipate—then click the shutter. It’ll make travel more fun, too.

Deborah Sandidge  |  Sep 21, 2017  |  0 comments

I ended the March 2017 column on my must-have lenses for travel photography and the tripods that support them with a promise that there’d be a part two on the gear that goes beyond cameras and lenses to enable me to get the pictures I envision.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Dec 12, 2011  |  First Published: Nov 01, 2011  |  0 comments

When I say filter, your first thought may be a Photoshop plug-in. That’s natural, especially if your first good camera was digital. But folks who cut their photographic teeth shooting 35mm film know all about the light-bending qualities of glass screw-in filters. Physical filters were once the best (and sometimes only) way to get certain types of creative shots. Although still as effective as ever, they’ve fallen from favor for several reasons.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Jan 27, 2017  |  1 comments

Ever drop a camera? Ever have a camera strap break? Or bust apart near the D-ring? Put those worries out of your mind. UPstrap offers a full lineup of some of the toughest camera straps you’ll ever wear. And, as the name proudly announces, they stay UP on your shoulder, too. 

George Schaub  |  Dec 24, 2013  |  First Published: Nov 01, 2013  |  0 comments

The Vanguard ABEO Pro Kit starts out as a solid carbon-fiber tripod but then adds features and functions like a removable and rotatable (vertical or horizontal) center column, a pistol grip with built-in trigger release with cable attachments for many cameras, bubble levels, 80-degree leg spread, three “feet” supports (pads, spikes, and rubber), a quick-release base plate and mechanism, and etched degree settings on the center column for those who want to do precise panoramas.

George Schaub  |  Dec 07, 2017  |  0 comments

While image stabilization in camera bodies and lenses has stretched the bounds of slow shutter speed usage, there’s nothing that can take the place of a good tripod in terms of image sharpness and the ability to take advantage of today’s camera technology. Working with HDR, with very long exposure times, and the ability to shoot at virtually any aperture and shutter speed without resorting to excessive ISOs are obvious benefits. 

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Aug 20, 2015  |  1 comments

I’m as bad as the next guy when it comes to tripods. I know I should know better—they’re the only accessory you can buy that has the potential to improve every single picture you take. I’ve written about tripods at least a hundred times. That said, there have been too many occasions when I’ve been two-legged when I should have used three.

George Schaub  |  Jul 18, 2012  |  First Published: Jun 01, 2012  |  2 comments

Wacom recently introduced their new line of Bamboo tablets, and we thought we’d revisit the use of stylus and tablet tools to give it a try. For our test we worked with the Bamboo Capture, described by the company as most apt for enthusiast digital photographers, although there are three intros in this new line.

Jon Canfield  |  Nov 20, 2012  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2012  |  0 comments

I’ve been a long-time user of Wacom graphic tablets as part of my editing workflow. Making selections, painting a mask, and many other operations are not only more intuitive with a pen, but you have much finer control than you do with a mouse or trackpad. Until now, the Intuos4 Wireless tablet with Bluetooth has been what I considered to be as close to perfect as you could get. Used either left- or right-handed, I can have it plugged in via USB or use with Bluetooth when traveling or when I need to be a bit further from the computer, as when I’m teaching a workshop. When Wacom announced the Intuos5, I was curious as to what could possibly be improved upon from the current model, so I was anxious to take a look.

Jon Canfield  |  Aug 10, 2009  |  First Published: Sep 01, 2009  |  0 comments

Wacom is probably the best known name and certainly one of the most popular brands around.

Jack Neubart  |  Dec 13, 2013  |  First Published: Nov 01, 2013  |  3 comments

The conventional camera strap does the job, but with some gear can put considerable strain on the neck, tempting you to hang your camera from the shoulder, where it may slip off or invite thieves. Like a good backpack, today’s ergonomically designed camera-carrying systems largely relieve that stress and throw in some extras in the bargain. New age straps feature a more comfortable neck/shoulder pad than found on conventional neck straps, so you’ll still be comfortable hours later, and often with a quick-release mechanism to rapidly detach the camera when the need arises. Many are of a sling design aimed at the “quick shooters” among you, and some are so innovative as to almost defy description. A few even let you comfortably and safely carry two cameras at the same time.

George Schaub  |  Feb 01, 2010  |  0 comments

The latest manifestation of desktop back-up devices from Western Digital, the My Book Studio Edition II, makes what might have seemed to some as a difficult task—backing up and retrieving image and other files—quite easy.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Jun 04, 2015  |  0 comments

Before you get any ideas about drafting a posse and coming after me with tar and feathers because of my computer platform preferences, let me explain—please. Because I write about digital photography I must use both PCs and Macs so that I can deliver balanced stories and explain computer functions to our entire audience, not just one group or the other.

Dan Havlik  |  Jan 30, 2019  |  0 comments

More and more Shutterbug readers are launching their own photography vlogging channels to share their work and wisdom, so we thought we’d spread the news about this latest tripod “find” from popular photo vlogger Peter McKinnon. In the below video, McKinnon talks about why he likes the new SwitchPod, which is designed as a “minimal, versatile, handheld tripod.”

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