Software How To

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Ron Leach  |  Jun 19, 2017  |  0 comments

Last week we explored the differences between Lightroom and Photoshop to help you choose the software package that best suits your needs. In the video below, image-editing expert Peter McKinnon explains why he says, “Every photographer should be using Lightroom.” 

Ron Leach  |  Jun 16, 2017  |  0 comments

Benjamin Jaworskyj is a self-taught adventure photographer who you might say is just a bit “zany.” Not only does he shoot awesome images, but he uses a great sense of humor to offer some helpful tips and tricks.

Ron Leach  |  Jun 16, 2017  |  0 comments

Photoshop’s powerful Radial Gradient Tool can be used for a variety of applications. In the straightforward tutorial below, image-editing expert Blake Rudis explains why this oft-ignored tool is one of his favorites, and how you can use it to easily enhance both landscape and portrait photographs.

Ron Leach  |  Jun 15, 2017  |  0 comments

One of the most frequent questions we receive from those new to image editing is, “Should I buy Lightroom or Photoshop?” The simple answer is, “It depends.” For some photographers Lightroom is the best choice, while for others Photoshop makes more sense. And depending upon one’s needs, we may recommend getting both.

Ron Leach  |  Jun 09, 2017  |  0 comments

There are a number of ways to convert color images to B&W, and the proper technique to use often depends upon the type of photograph you’re working on. Portraits call for one approach, while landscapes or street scenes may work best with another.

Ron Leach  |  Jun 09, 2017  |  0 comments

Photographs often have more depth and drama when there are shadows in the scene, but unfortunately the light doesn’t always cooperate. In the quick video below you’ll learn how to use Photoshop to create and manipulate a shadow so it appears totally real. 

Ron Leach  |  Jun 07, 2017  |  0 comments

One way to add impact to wildlife and nature photographs it to convey a sense of motion in the scene. In the video below you’ll learn how to accomplish that task with an easy Photoshop image-stacking technique.

Ron Leach  |  Jun 06, 2017  |  0 comments

There are a number of compositional tricks photographers use to emphasize the main subject in a photograph. Another way to achieve a similar result is to use Photoshop to throw the background out of focus.

Ron Leach  |  Jun 02, 2017  |  0 comments

Russell Brown is a Senior Creative Director at Adobe, specializing in helpful Photoshop and Lightroom tutorials. In the interesting video below he demonstrates a method of adjusting colors he discovered “in the beginning of time” that is as helpful as ever today.

Ron Leach  |  May 31, 2017  |  0 comments

The accurate colorization of old black-and-white photos involves a combination of artistry, painstaking research, physics and digital technology. And when the effort yields a realistic and vibrant reconstruction of the historical past, the result is quite magical.

Ron Leach  |  May 30, 2017  |  0 comments

Artist Ben Grant became inspired by satellite imagery after learning of what’s known as the “overview effect”—a sensation astronauts experience when they look down from space and view Earth as a whole. It’s at that moment, Grant says, that astronauts “have the chance to appreciate our home in its entirety, to reflect on its beauty and its fragility all at once.”

Ron Leach  |  May 30, 2017  |  0 comments

If you are like most photographers you’d prefer to spend less time behind the computer and more time out shooting. In the quick video below you’ll learn a streamlined Lightroom workflow that will drastically reduce your processing time.

Ron Leach  |  May 30, 2017  |  0 comments

If you’ve ever marveled at a spectacular landscape photograph and wondered how it was made, there’s a good chance the photographer employed a luminosity masking technique in Photoshop that provides extremely precise control over post-processing adjustments.

Ron Leach  |  May 25, 2017  |  0 comments

Here’s a quick tutorial enabling you to create unique images with subjects appearing to float within a scene. The interesting technique involves nothing more than simple editing and compositing of two images in Photoshop and Lightroom. 

Scott Kelby  |  May 24, 2017  |  0 comments

Q. Re: your answer to the question about solving noise problems in the writer’s wedding shots in the February 2017 issue. You mentioned Photoshop, Lightroom, and Nik for noise reduction, but left out the best noise reduction software I’ve ever used—DxO’s OpticsPro 11. I had great night shots of lava flowing into the sea off Hawaii that were unusable because of noise, but OpticsPro 11 Prime worked wonders.

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