Portrait Photography How To

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Ron Leach  |  Jun 02, 2016  |  1 comments

NY-based photographer Richard Renaldi embarked on his “Touching Strangers” project in 2007, in which he has complete strangers pose together for an affectionate portrait. Since then he’s set up his 8x10 view camera in cities across the U.S. and asked passersby to interact as though they were close friends or loved ones.

Suzanne Driscoll  |  Apr 01, 2016  |  0 comments

To say that Art Wolfe is not your typical portrait photographer is quite the understatement. With a career spanning 40 years, Wolfe brings his travels from every corner of the earth to create stunning portraits in his Human Canvas collection, honoring the traditions of Ethiopian tribal culture.

Ron Leach  |  Mar 30, 2016  |  0 comments

Here’s an interesting video in which Chief White House Photographer Pete Souza explains how he makes such intimate images of President Obama who considers him a friend. In the past Souza was an Official White House Photographer for President Reagan and a freelancer for National Geographic. He also worked for the Chicago Tribune in their Washington bureau.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Mar 29, 2016  |  0 comments

What we look at when we look at a Sandro portrait is an image that is as much about Sandro as it is about his subject. About that he is frank and fearless.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Mar 29, 2016  |  0 comments

Because her intent is to get the absolute best image in-camera, Lindsey Thorne is “pretty exact when it comes to lighting and posing.” When she describes her studio, the scene of almost all her boudoir sessions, as “modest and simple,” she’s citing an advantage. “I love shooting in a smaller room because I have so much control over the light.”

Staff  |  Mar 22, 2016  |  0 comments

For this assignment, we were looking for your best wedding, portrait, and boudoir images and while Shutterbug readers submitted many good wedding and boudoir shots, it was the portraits that really stood out. Overall, we were looking for interesting angles on these popular photography genres and we got them. We didn’t want those standard “grip and grin” group shots from your Aunt Sally’s wedding reception and we weren’t seeking cheesy boudoir images that look like they should be on the cover of a romance novel from the 1960s.

Jack Neubart  |  Mar 18, 2016  |  0 comments

Photographing people for a living can prove intimidating for many photographers. Now add “celebrity” to that and you may find you have to step up your game several notches to stand on equal footing with your subject. You can’t afford to be intimidated and you certainly can’t afford to appear unsure of yourself or to question your decisions. You have to enter the picture with a game plan and be decisive, know which lens you’ll be using, what lights, and where to place those lights. But you also have to be prepared for the unexpected. That’s why they give these jobs to photographers such as Victoria Will.

Staff  |  Mar 18, 2016  |  0 comments

While in Hawaii for a month-long shoot in 2013, Colin Anderson was fortunate enough to meet a native named Pomai. Upon talking to him, Anderson discovered that his lineage dated back 27 generations, which meant his roots predated that of King Kamehameha the Great.

Maria Piscopo  |  Mar 15, 2016  |  1 comments

R. J. Kern is the owner and photographer of Kern-Photo, a Minneapolis-based wedding photography business. He started the company eight years ago after spending five years with the National Geographic Society. His wedding photography locations range from backyards to destinations around the world. He also teaches photography workshops and has won many awards, including making the “50 Top US Wedding Photographers”.

Steve Bedell  |  Jan 25, 2016  |  0 comments

When I’m looking at ways to do a specific task my brain often reverts to Occam’s razor. (Occam was a logician and Franciscan friar in the 14th century.) The way I interpret it, is that if there are many ways to do something the easiest and most direct method is usually correct. It’s the KIS principle and keeping it simple works best for me. Like most people, especially those of us who are self employed, there aren’t enough hours in the day, so I’m extremely concerned about workflow and just how much time each project is going to take. If I have a task, like organizing and editing my work, that I can do one way that takes an hour and another that takes 30 minutes, I’ll take the 30 minute option every time. With all that said, I’ll explain how I handle a portrait session, from the original shoot to ordering the final images. It may or may not fit your way of doing things, but just keep my buddy Occam in mind and remember there’s more to life than sitting in front of a computer.

Dan Havlik  |  Jan 11, 2016  |  0 comments

We’re still in shock over the death today of legendary musician and artist David Bowie. Someone who knew Bowie more than most folks was renowned fashion photographer Brian Duffy who, between 1972 and 1980, worked with Bowie on five photo projects, including three of his most famous album covers.

Jack Neubart  |  Dec 29, 2015  |  0 comments

For those of you who have never worked in medium format, trust me, there is a difference you can see and feel. It’s no wonder that photographers such as Douglas Sonders choose a medium format camera system over a DSLR for the bulk of their work. And in Sonders’s case, his workhorse camera system is Phase One.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Dec 15, 2015  |  0 comments

This fun and informative video from COOPH photographer Leo Rosas documents the dramatic evolution of photographic technology through the decades—from the very start to today in about two minutes. 

Cynthia Boylan  |  Nov 24, 2015  |  0 comments

In this clever seven-minute video, New York-based portrait photographer Peter Hurley offers a simple trick to help you create more flattering portraits.

Scott Kelby  |  Nov 24, 2015  |  1 comments

Hi everybody! I’m very excited to be launching a new Q&A column here in Shutterbug—a magazine I’ve been reading, and been a fan of, for so many years—so it’s truly an honor to be here with you. I invite you to send in your questions to editorial@shutterbug.com, and I’ll do my best to answer them in Ask a Pro. OK, let’s jump right to it.

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