Film Photography News

Sort By:  Post Date TitlePublish Date
Roger W. Hicks  |  May 21, 2013  |  First Published: Apr 01, 2013  |  0 comments

Here’s another in our series of reports from photokina 2012. As you will have noticed we do not attempt to create a laundry list of new products and companies from the show, but prefer to report on what struck our eye and thought might be of special interest to Shutterbug readers. In this report Roger Hicks tells us about numerous instances of life in the film arena he found at the show, with special cameras, film, paper, and even processors part of the mix.—Editor

George Schaub  |  Jan 28, 2013  |  4 comments

Early photographers were bedeviled by the slowness of their sensitized materials. Though exposure times were eventually shortened to workable lengths, early studios used neck braces and confining chairs to keep their subjects still while the exposure was being made.

George Schaub  |  Dec 26, 2012  |  16 comments

While black and white digital photography is based on the conversion of a color (RGB) image to monochrome via software, those who remain adherents of film photography have an entirely different route to obtaining a black and white image.

George Schaub  |  Dec 16, 2012  |  4 comments

The reaction to a human face is inherently stronger than to any inanimate object or arrangement. The expression, body language, placement and lighting often overcome the processing and/or printing technique, or at the least dictate much of the approach.

George Schaub  |  Dec 11, 2012  |  3 comments

When a photographer deals with the emotions generated by black-and-white prints, and the methodology of creating and defining those emotions and how they are generated, he or she begins to deal with developing a sense of the aesthetics of the monochrome image.

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz  |  Jan 01, 2011  |  0 comments

Let’s be honest. One thing no one would have expected at photokina was a unique new black-and-white silver halide process. But that’s what we got. Well, not exactly brand new. It’s a revival of a technology that hasn’t been seen in decades, quite possibly not in the lifetime of many of our readers: direct reversal paper.

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz  |  Sep 01, 2009  |  0 comments

Kodak’s new Ektar 100 is a film of unparalleled fine grain, very high sharpness, and excellent color rendition.

Joe Farace  |  Sep 01, 2009  |  0 comments

At photokina in September 2008 Kodak announced its Professional Ektar film in 35mm format.

Frances E. Schultz  |  Jan 01, 2009  |  0 comments

At two very well-attended open forums, Kodak asked the all-important question: “What’s film got to do with it?” The answer, given by four top professionals (Amy Postle, Pep Bonet, Det Kempe, and Eddie Soloway), cheered on by large audiences, turned out to be “A lot more than you might think.”

I forget which of them first said, “I use digital...

Robert E. Mayer  |  Jun 01, 2008  |  0 comments

As would be anticipated in this ever more dominant digital world, there were very few new offerings from silver-based film and paper firms, and even less for the conventional darkroom. Here are the few items I did locate:

 

Fuji has the new Fujicolor Crystal Archive Preferred color reversal RA-4 process paper that's said to offer vivid color reproduction, brilliant...

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz  |  May 01, 2008  |  0 comments

Film photographers are a cantankerous and ungrateful crew, often greeting revised films with suspicion and resentment instead of hope and pleasure. To some extent this is understandable, because they usually have to establish new development times and possibly new exposure indices, too; but the manufacturers' claimed improvements are usually honest, and without them...

Roger W. Hicks  |  Feb 01, 2008  |  0 comments

There is a saying: remember, you are unique, just like every other human being. There is also the question of how far we are shaped by our genes, and how far by our upbringing.

 

Similar observations apply to infrared (IR) films. No two emulsions are quite the same (genetic uniqueness), and even with the same emulsion, each photographer has a different regime for...

George Schaub  |  Dec 01, 2007  |  0 comments

Last year we reported that Fujifilm had promised to be the "last man standing" when it came to maintaining and introducing new films, and we are happy to report that their promise has been kept. With a recently introduced Fujichrome Provia 400 and a return of Fujichrome Velvia 50, the company continues to upgrade its chrome film line with new emulsions that improve...

Robert E. Mayer  |  Jul 01, 2007  |  0 comments

After a thorough walk about the entire two-floor trade show at the 2007 PMA this old photographer was pleasantly surprised to learn that in spite of some type or form of digitizing being involved in nearly everything photographic displayed at the show, film is not dead--yet!

The Agfa brand is getting back into the market in the U.S.A. with Vista color...

Pages

X