Photo Accessory Reviews

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Matthew Bamberg  |  Dec 17, 2012  |  First Published: Nov 01, 2012  |  11 comments

Photographers should back up their image files—it’s as simple as that—and there are numerous services that offer their services today. In this article I’ll be looking at one, Carbonite (www.carbonite.com), that works somewhat differently from others. Many people have told me that their $59 per year for the Home Plan, unlimited backup, is a steal, so I thought I’d check it out.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Oct 01, 2021  |  1 comments

Binoculars have only one purpose: they make distant objects appear closer. They all look pretty much alike, too.  But don’t be fooled into thinking that they’re all the same. Here’s a straightforward, plain-talk guide to buying the binoculars best for you.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Jun 11, 2015  |  0 comments

Raise your hand if you’ve ever taken a flash photo and wished a) it wasn’t so washed out, b) it didn’t have those harsh, black shadows behind the subject, c) it wasn’t so bluish all over, or d) it were possible to do it all over again because the results just plain sucked. Does this picture sound familiar? You need a flash modifier. In fact, you may need a BounceLite.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  May 07, 2020  |  0 comments

Wet happens. Having photography without protection in unstable climates is more than risky—it’s an invitation to calamity. Practicing unprotected video may seem like a safer alternative, but that’s a myth. Why take chances with something as precious as your camera? Here’s a look at five products you should have on hand when life deals up an unexpected cloudburst.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Sep 19, 2013  |  0 comments

The cleverly engineered CapturePRO Camera Clip from Peak Design provides a secure and convenient way to attach a camera to your belt, backpack or other strap. It’s a quick-draw device that allows you to spring into action instantly—but locks down your camera safely when not in use.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Sep 14, 2017  |  0 comments

Many people still use the wide camera strap that came with their digital camera, but I’ll never understand why. You wouldn’t wear the same shoes for all occasions and all weather conditions, would you? High heels to play softball? Moccasins with a tuxedo? Here are three unique straps from three excellent companies because one is not enough. 

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Jul 31, 2015  |  0 comments

A few years back, while waiting for a beautiful but thoroughly flakey model in the parking lot of a restaurant near Liberty State Park, my boredom was interrupted by a black Lincoln Town Car that slipped suspiciously past me and parked a few spaces away. After several minutes, two men exited the sedan. They were wearing tuxedos and looked rather serious. The trunk lid popped open. Ignoring me completely, they rummaged through the trunk. One of the men removed his tux jacket and strapped on a large black holster. A moment later, the other did the same. I slid down in my seat, wondering if I was about to witness some weird reenactment of High Noon, right there in Jersey City.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Oct 02, 2020  |  0 comments

See a spot of color you like? Scan it with this $59 doodad and instantly your smartphone shows the RGB values – and a lot of other stuff, including what brands and shades of paint to buy to match that color accurately. The Datacolor ColorReader EZ DC10-3 even suggests a full palette of other colors that complement the sample scanned. For photographers it’s a chance to objectively identify colors numerically and replicate them in Photoshop.

Jon Canfield  |  Sep 06, 2012  |  First Published: Aug 01, 2012  |  0 comments

One of the most common complaints about digital imaging is the lack of consistency when going from one device to another—most commonly screen to print. Dark prints are the typical complaint, but color shifts are also a contributor to choice language and lack of hair. Yes, we tweak the image until the sky is that perfect hue of blue, or the skin tones have just the right amount of warmth and vibrancy. When it’s all done, the image is posted online or printed and it looks nothing like what we expected. The image is too dark, skin tones are too red, any number of problems. Where did it go wrong?

 

In almost all cases, the culprit is an uncalibrated display. Back when CRT displays were the common screen type, color could be wildly different and it was usually pretty easy to detect when the display was at fault. With modern LCD displays that isn’t necessarily the case—color is often close to correct in hue, but luminance, or brightness, is where the problem usually lies.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Oct 10, 2019  |  0 comments

Pssst! Got two minutes? Calibrate your monitor with the new Datacolor SpyderX Elite so that you’re not looking at your image gallery through a dirty screen door.

Jon Canfield  |  Oct 01, 2010  |  0 comments

“The Spyder3Express is the latest incarnation of Datacolor’s monitor calibration hardware. It does one thing—calibrate your display—and does it well.”...

Joe Farace  |  Feb 21, 2017  |  0 comments

Capturing “the decisive moment” is more than just clicking the shutter at the right time and it’s more than luck, too. It’s an artful combination of experience, talent, and preparation. Being prepared for the unexpected is just as important to photojournalists and documentary photographers as it is to a Scout and that includes selecting and using gear that can be deployed at that right time, even if preparing for a single shot or two takes several hours. Some of these tools may be obvious while others not so much.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Sep 18, 2020  |  0 comments

Don’t gamble with your image files. If you’re serious about the pictures you take, be serious about the memory cards you use to store them. There is a handful of reliable, consistently dependable brands available, and one of the most popular with advanced photographers is the Delkin Black lineup. Let’s zero in on their latest SD card and find out why.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Apr 11, 2019  |  0 comments

Answer quickly—what is the brand and capacity of the memory card that’s in your primary camera right this minute? Don’t know? Read this and you might want to switch to a card made by Delkin Devices.

David B. Brooks  |  Jun 10, 2011  |  First Published: May 01, 2011  |  0 comments

A Shutterbug reader, Tracy Valleau, e-mailed me, suggesting that I take a look at the 24” widescreen Dell UltraSharp U2410 LCD display with 1920x1200 pixel resolution. What makes it suitable for digital photography and professional graphics is its wide color gamut of 96 percent of Adobe RGB and the fact that its white luminance is adjustable from 80.0 to 90.0 CD/m2, both of which provide a high reproduction screen image quality. Its 12-bit internal processing assures a smooth rendition of tones on screen. The screen is in a bezel and stand that is sturdy but light, with an excellent design that’s carefully manufactured. In all respects, this Dell U2410 is quite affordable at a list price of $599, while entirely competitive with more expensive brands favored for a color-managed digital photography workflow.

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