Lens News

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Cynthia Boylan  |  Apr 13, 2015  |  0 comments

CW Sonderoptic just unveiled the Leica M PL Mount, which lets you use cinema lenses with a Leica M rangefinder camera.

Joe Farace  |  Feb 21, 2017  |  0 comments

Capturing “the decisive moment” is more than just clicking the shutter at the right time and it’s more than luck, too. It’s an artful combination of experience, talent, and preparation. Being prepared for the unexpected is just as important to photojournalists and documentary photographers as it is to a Scout and that includes selecting and using gear that can be deployed at that right time, even if preparing for a single shot or two takes several hours. Some of these tools may be obvious while others not so much.

Dan Havlik  |  Apr 16, 2018  |  0 comments

British pro Thomas Heaton’s latest video has a provocative title: “Throw Away Your Wide-Angle Lens.” Does he mean it? Not really, but Heaton, who is an acclaimed landscape and nature photographer, does have a point to make about lens choices when shooting outdoors.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Nov 20, 2015  |  0 comments

Many, many years ago a coworker at Altman Camera in Chicago showed me that it was possible to screw a Vivitar +10 Macro Adapter into a partially disassembled set of Nikon K-series extension rings and thereby build a soft focus lens that practically exploded with delightfully horrendous aberrations. It was fixed-focus, you had to bob to-and-fro like a drunken sailor to use it, but it was sensationally unsharp and I’ve been hooked on this genre ever since.

Ron Leach  |  Jan 29, 2018  |  0 comments

Nikon users love their prized Nikkor glass, which the company says is built “to the highest standards of craftsmanship to deliver images of unrivaled clarity and sharpness.” In this interesting video from the My Nikon Life YouTube channel, you’ll get a look at the optical and mechanical technology that goes into Nikkor lenses.

Peter K. Burian  |  Jun 01, 2009  |  0 comments

Although zoom lenses are certainly versatile and convenient, they do have some drawbacks, including relatively small maximum apertures.

Joe Farace  |  Dec 16, 2016  |  0 comments

Sports photography shares much in common with capturing images of wildlife: You’ve got an active scene captured at a distance requiring specialized equipment and knowledge of the subject’s activities while anticipating what they are going to do next…or not. Sure, you’ll need fast, long focal length lenses but you will also need camera supports and other gear that along with specialized knowledge separates the virtuosos, like Regis Lefebure (regislefebure.com), from the wannabes. Here’s a look at some of our favorite tools of the sports trade.

Stan Trzoniec  |  Sep 09, 2011  |  First Published: Aug 01, 2011  |  0 comments

With the availability of sky-high ISOs on digital cameras and VR on slower lenses, some have argued that it’s not practical or economical to work with fast, prime lenses anymore. On the other hand, lenses like the Nikkor 24mm f/1.4G ED (list: $2200) and 50mm f/1.4G (list: $485) serve a distinct purpose for not only the obvious low-light advantages but also for the very, very shallow depth of field they can deliver.

Stan Trzoniec  |  May 16, 2012  |  First Published: Apr 01, 2012  |  0 comments

There are two general classifications of lenses that define how you use them in the field—zooms and single focal length, the former being a variable focal length lens that has many convenient advantages, and the latter being a single focal length that, in the group we’re covering here, is what’s known as a “fast” lens. Fast doesn’t mean that it focuses quicker than its zoom cousins, though it might—it usually means that it offers a wide maximum aperture, anywhere from f/1.2 to f/2.8, and that aperture stays put, unlike some zooms where the aperture varies by going narrower as you zoom into longer focal lengths. And to help refine the group we’re covering here we’re also topping out the focal length at 50mm, which makes these lenses prime for street and low-light photography, candid and photojournalism work.

The Editors  |  Oct 24, 2015  |  0 comments

At the PhotoPlus Expo 2015 show in New York City this week, we met up with Billy Luong from Fujifilm who showed us all the key features of the brand new Fujinon XF 35mm F/2 WR lens in this short take video.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Feb 16, 2017  |  0 comments

It was portrait shooter’s paradise with two new Sony lenses this week. The 100mm STF is a veritable bokeh machine, while the FE 85mm f/1.8 is a budget-friendly, professional quality portrait lens. Sony invited a small group of editors to a private studio and assured us that we were the first journalists in the world to shoot with this new glass.

Jack Neubart  |  Aug 01, 2010  |  0 comments

Fisheye optics are an unusual beast. The bulbous nature of the front element is one characteristic trademark, but the unique view this lens affords us is what makes it truly appealing—and at the same time challenging to work with.

My fisheye lenses have literally widened my view of the world around me and given me a new perspective on my photography. Admittedly, some...

Ron Leach  |  Mar 30, 2016  |  0 comments

Using filters with ultrawide lenses can often be a difficult proposition but Fotodiox has just launched a nifty solution. Called the Wonderpana FreeArc XL, the innovative filter system enables Canon shooters to use NDs, polarizers and other filters on the ultrawide Canon 11–24mm lens.

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz  |  Aug 01, 2008  |  0 comments

Understatement almost always speaks louder than overstatement; or if not louder, then generally with more authority. The four new Leica Summarits, for M-series Leicas, Zeiss Ikons, and Voigtländer Bessas, are about as far from ostentatious as you can get; they are merely first-class tools for the photographer who knows what he or she is doing.

Neither the...

Ron Leach  |  May 04, 2016  |  0 comments

Here’s a little something for those of you who can’t afford the new $6000 Leica M–D: Four quirky lenses you can get for under 30 bucks from Weird Lens Guru Mathieu Stern, whose passion is discovering odd optics you can adapt to your mirrorless camera to capture both still images and video. In this video Stern describes a quartet of lenses you can get for less than the cost of two decent cocktails in Paris.

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