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Jack Neubart  |  May 06, 2013  |  First Published: Apr 01, 2013  |  3 comments

The difference between a “constant” aperture zoom and other standard zooms is that when you increase the focal length on the standard zoom the maximum aperture narrows. This might make the difference between being able to hand hold or not when zooming in, and may indeed force the use of higher ISOs. Known as “fast” lenses, constant aperture zooms are pricier and bulkier than their variable-aperture counterparts. And to sweeten the pot, we’ve seen more and more fast lenses with built-in image stabilization, which gets you even more low light and steady shot capability.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Jul 25, 2019  |  0 comments

This year marks the 40th anniversary of Tamron’s SP (Superior Performance) lens series. They elected to commemorate this special occasion by introducing what they have labeled “the ultimate Tamron lens” in the form of the new SP Tamron 35mm F/1.4 Di USD (Model F045) prime lens in Canon EF and Nikon F mounts. 

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Sep 17, 2015  |  0 comments

To make a better lens, one that avid photographers might even be inclined to leave on their DSLR camera permanently, Tamron set aside all of their former notions about lens design and construction and went straight back to the basics with the new Tamron SP 35mm f1.8 Di VC USD (Model F012) and SP 45mm f1.8 Di VC USD (Model F013) prime lenses, which are the subjects of this review. 

Ron Leach  |  Jun 14, 2017  |  0 comments

One lens that should be in the arsenal of every photographer is a moderate telephoto zoom like a 70-200mm. Lenses in this category offer a great compromise between power, mobility, and versatility. They enable you to get in tight on nearby subjects, and unlike longer telephoto zooms, moderate telephotos are relatively lightweight, compact, and easy to carry.

George Schaub  |  Dec 17, 2013  |  First Published: Nov 01, 2013  |  1 comments

The 70-200mm focal length has been the standard tele-zoom choice for many years, offering near normal to a good tele range that suits many practical purposes. Yet, quite a few stock-in-trade 70-200mm lenses had been slow or lost significant aperture as soon as you left the shortest zoom setting, making them a real challenge for handheld, low-light, or even max focal length shooting. Certainly, improvements in sensors and processors in terms of the high ISO/image quality ratio have helped. If you’re too slow on shutter speed with a variable aperture zoom you can always jack up the sensitivity. But that’s not always a great choice and it seems to force you to compromise image quality just to make up for the lens losing “speed” just when you need it most.

Joe Farace  |  Jun 24, 2016  |  0 comments

If you read my article “Sweet Glass: My 10 Favorite Lenses For Portrait, Boudoir & Wedding Photography” you know I’m fond of the 85mm focal length for portraiture. If you didn't read it, please check it out after reading this review. And Tamron’s SP 85mm f/1.8 Di VC USD lens surely rings this bell. It’s available for Canon, Nikon and Sony mounts and as part of Tamron’s Di family is designed to work with APS-C format and full-frame SLR cameras. I tested the Canon EF version ($749.)

Jack Neubart  |  Apr 04, 2016  |  0 comments

I’ve always preferred longer focal-length macro lenses in the 90-100mm range because they give you more breathing room between the camera and skittish subjects than does standard (50/60mm) macros. No wonder, then, that one of my earliest lenses was the original Vivitar Series 1 90mm f/2.5 macro, which I first paired with a Minolta SR-T 102. I burned plenty of Kodachrome with that glass.

Jack Neubart  |  Mar 17, 2014  |  First Published: Feb 01, 2014  |  0 comments

When my fascination with macro began all my work was done by available light. Getting sharp images at life-size magnification took all the resolve I could muster, especially when dealing with heat and humidity or frigid conditions. It’s tough to hold a camera steady in those situations. What I wouldn’t have given for image stabilization!

George Schaub  |  Apr 06, 2009  |  0 comments

There was time when those seeking super-wide lenses for APS-C size sensor cameras didn’t have much choice, but new light gathering systems that distribute light evenly from lens to sensor, as well as new optical formulas from camera makers and independent lens manufacturers, have changed that point of view. The latest in this welcome new class of glass is from Tamron, with their 10-24mm f/3.5-4.5 offering. Priced at around $500 (street) and weighing in at about 14 oz., the Tamron 10-24mm is useable for cameras that require “motor in the lens” operation, such as the Nikon D40X, on which this lens was tested.  The DiII designation tells you that this lens is for digital SLRs with APS-C sensors.

 

 

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Shutterbug Staff  |  Feb 20, 2019  |  0 comments

Tamron said this morning it is developing three new lenses that will be available soon: two new lenses for full-frame DSLR cameras—the 35-150mm F/2.8-4 Di VC OSD (Model A043) zoom lens and the SP 35mm F/1.4 Di USD (Model F045) fixed focal lens; and a new high-speed ultra-wide-angle zoom lens for Sony E-mount full-frame mirrorless cameras—the 17-28mm F/2.8 Di III RXD (Model A046).

Shutterbug Staff  |  Feb 22, 2016  |  0 comments

Tamron unveiled another new lens this morning: the SP 90mm F/2.8 Di VC USD 1:1 MACRO (Model F017). The new SP 90mm F/2.8 Di VC USD 1:1 MACRO (Model F017) is the follow-up to the Tamron 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro from 2012, and has been updated with several key features.

Ron Leach  |  Feb 07, 2017  |  0 comments

Tamron has provided a new option for photographers looking for a fast telephoto zoom lens, with the introduction of the SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD G2 lens. This is a second-generation model, and is said to dramatically improve upon its predecessor with significantly faster autofocus, improved image stabilization, and enhanced optical quality.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Sep 02, 2015  |  0 comments

Tamron has annouced two intriguing new prime lenses: the Tamron SP 35mm f/1.8 Di VC USD and a 45mm f/1.8 Di VC USD. Both lenses offer close focus (7.9 and 11.4 in. respectively) and both are compatible with full-frame and APS-C sensor DSLR cameras.

Ron Leach  |  Jun 30, 2017  |  0 comments

Tamron has introduced the second-generation SP 24-70mm f/2.8 Di VC USD G2 zoom lens with a host of upgrades over its popular predecessor. This new version, Model A032, is constructed with specialized glass materials for optimum resolution, sharpness and color rendition.

Jack Neubart  |  Aug 01, 2010  |  0 comments

The new Tamron SP AF17-50mm F/2.8 XR Di II VC LD Aspherical (IF) joins a growing community of wide-zoom lenses. In contrast to an earlier version of this lens, which is available in several mounts, this APS-C Tamron optic (designated Model B005/$649 street price) is only available in Nikon DX (with built-in motor) and Canon mounts. Given that I mated this lens to a Nikon D300, that effectively...

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