Lens News

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Joe Farace  |  Dec 01, 2009  |  0 comments

In my heart I know that few readers can afford these kinds of expensive lenses, but there are always those who can and for the rest of us, it’s something to dream about.

Roger W. Hicks  |  Oct 01, 2005  |  0 comments

What do you want from a 75mm f/2 lens? Whatever it is, the new APO-Summicron-M Aspheric almost certainly delivers it--except, it must be said, low cost. Perfection, or as close as modern lens design can come to it, doesn't come cheap.

For reportage, it is superb: fast, compact, and convenient. Of course, you don't normally need or expect ultimate...

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz  |  Nov 01, 2008  |  0 comments

If you own and use an M-series Leica, a Zeiss Ikon, or a bayonet-mount Voigtländer Bessa, Leica’s 16-18-21mm Tri-Elmar is so staggeringly desirable that it is almost easier to list the reasons for not buying one than to list its advantages—though these are easy enough to list, too. It is compact, sweet handling, sharp, contrasty, rangefinder-coupled, unbelievably convenient, and...

Ron Leach  |  May 01, 2017  |  0 comments

Focal length is a simple but extremely important photographic concept, and in this quick video you’ll learn all you need to know to make the most of the lenses you have as well as those you acquire in the future.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Jun 24, 2015  |  0 comments

Every photographer knows that it can often be difficult to quickly change lenses safely when you’re on location or capturing images in a city or in the wilderness. The Lens Flipper in a unique device that takes the stress out of the process. It is an easy to use double-sided locking lens cap with its own strap.

Ron Leach  |  Jan 30, 2017  |  0 comments

We typically turn to lens guru Mathieu Stern for tips on cheap, vintage lenses that can be adapted for use with today’s modern digital cameras. But in the helpful video below, Stern provides a simple solution for the often-vexing problem of mold and fungus that is often found inside older lenses.

Joe Farace  |  Mar 14, 2017  |  0 comments

The late Mr. Newton was certainly onto something. I believe the overwhelming desire of most portrait photographers is to please the client, with seduction, amusement, and entertainment far from their minds. Let me submit this idea: shoot what the client says they want and then shoot something challenging their assumptions. Most wedding clients tend to be traditional but even introducing black and white or infrared images can increase sales and show clients you’re thinking outside the veil.

Joe Farace  |  Dec 03, 2014  |  0 comments

Tamron is a pioneer in all-in-one, do-everything lenses. Their new 28-300mm f/3.5-6.3 Di PZD lens is designed for Canon, Nikon and Sony shooters and I tested the Canon EF version using an EOS 5D Mark I and an EOS 50D, which changes the lens’ angle-of-view to that of a 45-480mm lens.

Ron Leach  |  Dec 15, 2017  |  0 comments

High-performance zoom lenses with fast maximum apertures are powerful tools for everyday shooting, and in this battle of the mid-range zooms, you’ll see a comparison between two of the best: The Canon 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM, and Sigma’s 24-70mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM Art.

Seth Shostak  |  May 03, 2018  |  0 comments

It’s a commandment brought down from the mountain: spend less on the camera if necessary, but don’t skimp on the lenses.

Ron Leach  |  Mar 17, 2017  |  0 comments

Earlier this month we wrote about the website What The Lens that’s designed to help you choose a perfect lens for your type of photography. The catch is that site is limited to Canon shooters. But now the new website Lens vs. Lens helps you be a smarter shopper by comparing actual photos taken with Fuji, Nikon, Olympus, Sony and Leica lenses, as well as those made by Canon.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  May 25, 2014  |  0 comments

Misprint? No. The latest “all-in-one” zoom lens from Tamron ranges from 16mm to 300mm, the equivalent of 24mm to 450mm on my Nikon D300s (with APS-C size sensor). Add Vibration Compensation (VC), excellent Macro focusing and PZD Piezo Drive for quiet and blazing-fast autofocus and you’ve got “Lensational.”

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Oct 26, 2015  |  0 comments

Sometimes an old fashioned recipe and the latest modern technology don’t mix: zap-blasting your grandmother’s vegetable soup ingredients in a 10,000-watt microwave instead of slowly simmering them for six hours, for example. But other times strange bedfellows bring out the best in each other. Such is the case with Lensbaby optics on modern digital cameras.

George Schaub  |  Jun 15, 2012  |  First Published: May 01, 2012  |  0 comments

There are three main elements in depth of field—focal length, aperture, and distance to subject—and depth of field is a very important part of a 2D photograph. It’s how we judge scale (or are fooled by it), how we note the importance of certain subjects within the frame, and how we define content and context in the scene. With these three controls, and using various points of view, it seems we have infinite variations to choose from, and that’s part of the creative play of photography. Now you can add a fourth element to the mix—tilts that range from mild to extreme and that create “slices” of sharpness within the frame. The tool that helps us create that effect is the latest optic from Lensbaby, which they dub the Edge 80.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Apr 08, 2015  |  0 comments

Lensbaby recently introduced the latest addition to its unique line of creative lenses. The new Velvet 56 is a 56mm f/1.6 lens for DSLRs and mirrorless cameras. It's a classic portrait lens with 1:2 macro capabilities designed to deliver "a velvety, glowing, ethereal look at brighter apertures," according Lensbaby, and sharp (but subtly unique) images as you stop down.

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