Lens News

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Shutterbug Staff  |  Jun 29, 2018  |  0 comments

We have some photographer friends, who shall remain nameless, who suffer from WAA syndrome. Never heard of it? Well, WAA stands for Wide Angle Abuse.

Hernan Rodriguez  |  Sep 14, 2018  |  0 comments

My approach to taking portraits is simple: I want to capture natural, relatable images, where I'm able to catch every individual's true essence and true identity. For me, prime lenses are the ideal type of lens for this type of photography.

The Editors  |  Aug 01, 2003  |  1 comments

Sun & Games Fun with the sun...and more

1. Sun Stars
Your wide-angle lens at its smallest aperture can turn the sun into a star in your photos—fitting, since the sun actually is a star. The effect occurs because the tiny aperture diffracts the incoming light rays a lot. This diffraction causes the star effect. You can include the sun as a compositional. Photo by...

Ron Leach  |  Feb 20, 2018  |  0 comments

We’re always amazed to see photographers shooting with high-end cameras and premium glass, without a hood on their lens. Often that’s because hoods are an optional purchase when buying a lens, while other times photographers fail to realize the significant difference an affordable hood can make in the quality of their images.

Jason Schneider  |  Sep 01, 2006  |  0 comments

In the first noteworthy change to the Leica M mount since its introduction back in 1954, all Leica M lenses delivered to dealers starting on July 1, 2006, will have a 6-bit digital black and white code applied to the bayonet ring. The physical dimensions and mechanical specs of the venerable M mount will remain exactly the same, so both coded and non-coded lenses can be used on...

Ron Leach  |  Dec 28, 2017  |  0 comments

We’re all familiar with the notion that lenses in the 85-105mm range are the best choices for portrait photography, supposedly because of the “natural” way they render a subject’s facial features. But in the video below, you’ll see why one pro prefers to use a longer telephoto zoom for portraiture. 

George Schaub  |  Feb 21, 2014  |  First Published: Jan 01, 2014  |  0 comments

A tilt-shift lens can be thought of as a flexible visual tool in the many ways it allows you to image the world. Unlike a standard lens, even a zoom, with a set point of view enforced by stance, elevation, focal length, and, within certain limits, depth of field, the tilt-shift lens opens visual doors a “fixed” lens will not. By tilting the lens within the mount you can enhance or greatly diminish depth of field beyond the “normal” abilities of the focal length and aperture setting. By shifting the lens you can “fix” perspective distortion or exaggerate it for “trick” effects.

Peter K. Burian  |  Dec 01, 2006  |  0 comments

Because of the increasing popularity of digital SLR cameras, Tamron has been upgrading their line of lenses to the "Digitally integrated" (Di) standard, employing methods discussed in our Technology sidebar. Some of the new products (Di II series) were designed exclusively for digital cameras with the typical APS-size sensor, while others (Di) are multi-platform...

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Apr 01, 2008  |  0 comments

Now that you've mastered the standard zoom lens that came with your D-SLR, you have to be asking yourself "what's next?" You bought a D-SLR instead of a compact camera so that you could change lenses. The question is: which lens to buy first? The answer is easy, but it all depends on what kind of pictures you like to take.

 

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Ron Leach  |  Jan 12, 2017  |  0 comments

Optical technology has advanced dramatically since the early days of zoom lenses when the consensus among serious photographers was that prime lenses offered far greater sharpness, resolution, color rendition and contrast than zoom lenses. In the video below, Matt Granger discusses that “misconception” as it pertains today, as well as the notion that prime lenses encourage more compositional creativity by forcing you to “zoom with your feet.”

Ron Leach  |  Jun 22, 2017  |  0 comments

Dirty camera sensors are a common source of degraded image quality, resulting in tedious post-processing work to clean up the photograph. This problem is the bane of those who shoot outdoors in dusty conditions, and is particularly acute when using small aperture settings that tend to exaggerate imperfections.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  May 04, 2017  |  0 comments

If the used camera lens you see online is packaged with a leash and a bone, odds are very good that it’s a dog. But in the absence of obvious evidence, how can you tell a bargain from a bagel? It’s impossible to physically examine the merchandise before purchase. And you can’t always trust what you see in the listing photos. However, you can conduct a thorough inspection upon receipt. Here are 10 things to check the minute the used lens is delivered. 

Ron Leach  |  Sep 19, 2016  |  0 comments

Fujifilm just created some major excitement at Photokina with the introduction of the 51.4-megapixel Fujifilm GFX medium format mirrorless camera and three lenses designed to handle future cameras with 100-megapixel resolution.

Ron Leach  |  Aug 01, 2016  |  0 comments

The new Samyang 35mm f/1.2 AS UMC CS is a relatively affordable high-speed lens designed for use with Sony E, MFT, Fujifilm X and Canon M mirrorless cameras. It’s scheduled to ship in September for around $500, and offers great versatility for low-light photography.

Ron Leach  |  Jan 27, 2017  |  1 comments

Ten years ago we ran an article extolling the virtues of soft focus lenses and explaining how to make a pretty sophisticated one yourself. And now, in the DIY video below, you’ll learn a less expensive method for making a basic version.

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