Travel Photography How To

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Maria Piscopo  |  Oct 04, 2018  |  0 comments

At this moment there are 32,527,830 #travelphotography posts on Instagram. With so many travel images posted online, and available for free, our business concern is that clients may find a great deal of those photos “good enough” to use. All of which makes it harder and harder to get a paying job as a travel or landscape photographer these days.

Jack Neubart  |  Apr 18, 2017  |  0 comments

Ira Block can best be described as a cultural documentary photographer. He uses his camera to document cultures around the world, recording how lives are impacted by changing norms, practices, and traditions. The changes are most often gradual, which is why he returns to a location time after time after time. He captures the shifting sands, one grain at a time, helping us see these changes and appreciate them through his eyes—and through social media.

Deborah Sandidge  |  Jul 19, 2017  |  0 comments

This may be strange to hear from a travel photographer, but I can make a case that location isn’t everything—light is. And I’d build my argument on the fact that the right light brings out the best in any location.

Shutterbug Staff  |  Sep 18, 2018  |  0 comments

With everyone taking selfies these days, why are so many of these self-portraits so terrible? And when couples shoot selfies together while traveling (such as on vacation), why do they only seem to capture their faces and none of the scenic surroundings?

Maria Piscopo  |  May 31, 2017  |  0 comments

Although everyone loves travel photography, not everyone possesses the skills to turn that passion into a viable business. This month we spoke with six photographers working (and making money) in the travel photography business: Joe Becker, Todd Gustafson, Blaine Harrington, Jen Pollack Bianco, and David and Lina Stock.

Andrea Keister  |  Oct 29, 2018  |  0 comments

During a weekend jaunt to Dublin, Ireland, Shutterbug reader Andy O’Farrell had planned to enjoy a couple of days shooting around the city. However, a monkey wrench had been thrown into his plans courtesy of Mother Nature.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Sep 20, 2018  |  0 comments

Given skill, experience, and the awesome capabilities of today’s gear, what else is it that makes a great travel photographer?

Jim Zuckerman  |  Mar 25, 2014  |  0 comments

There are two ways to travel. You can go with a group or you can travel independently where you plan the itinerary and make the arrangements. One isn’t necessarily less expensive than the other because it depends on so many factors, but the main issue to consider is this: what will you gain by being part of a group versus traveling alone or with a friend or spouse?

Dan Havlik  |  Nov 28, 2018  |  0 comments

Travel photographer Pierre T. Lambert has been on worldwide photo tour, shooting images and sharing how-to videos about his experiences. During his travels, he’s mainly been using two lenses for his Sony mirrorless camera: a 16-35mm and 70-200mm f/2.8.

Lynne Eodice  |  Feb 01, 2003  |  0 comments

Jason Lauré is a veteran of some 25 books during his years as a highly accomplished photojournalist, and his latest--Africatrek--is his most personal book to date. As the subtitle states, this story is "an American photographer's odyssey through Africa." However, this book offers us even more. It's the journey of Lauré's life...

Dan Havlik  |  Dec 22, 2014  |  0 comments

If the U.S. goes forward with its historic plan to open diplomatic ties with Cuba for the first time in 50 years, there will be a lot more photographers capturing this long isolated country. While Cuba hasn’t been entirely cut off photographically over the years, photo trips there have been limited and highly restricted.

Lynne Eodice  |  Jan 01, 2003  |  0 comments

Always artistic, Judith Pishnery was a natural choice to be her high school's yearbook photographer--an initial foray that resulted in her becoming "hooked" on photography. And, because one of her science teachers also taught photography on the side, "I would hang out in the biology department," she recalls.

 

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Efrain M. Padro  |  Aug 08, 2014  |  0 comments

I could hear the predawn call to prayer broadcast from minarets across the city as I climbed the stairs to my hotel’s rooftop. From there I enjoyed a magnificent view of the ancient city of Istanbul. Immediately below me, roughly facing north, was Sultanahmet Square, the city’s historic center, flanked by the Blue Mosque to the left and the Hagia Sophia to the right. Behind and to my right I could see the Sea of Marmara and Asia, while in the distance to the northeast I could see the Strait of Bosphorus. As I stood alone on the rooftop in this city of 14 million people, admiring the view all around, it occurred to me I should get out my camera and take some pictures.

Rich Sheremeta  |  Dec 19, 2012  |  First Published: Nov 01, 2012  |  1 comments

Montana’s rich mining history dates back well over 100 years. In the year 1852, gold was first discovered southeast of Drummond, along Gold Creek, at a site that later became known as the Pioneer Mining District. But it wasn’t until a decade later, in 1862, that a group of prospectors from Colorado discovered gold along Grasshopper Creek, at what was to become the Bannack Town Site, which fueled the Montana gold rush.

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