Outdoor Photography How To

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Dan Havlik  |  Oct 04, 2016  |  0 comments

Here’s another hilarious video from folks at TheCameraStoreTV, which poses the question: If you were lost in the wild, could your photo gear help save your life? 

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Aug 05, 2016  |  0 comments

I’d been looking for a nature photo—a grabber with a story behind it. I found it on the cover of The Killing Lessons, a compelling, disturbing crime novel I was reading. The photo had obviously been manipulated to serve the novel’s plot, so in addition to a likely story behind the image, there’s a story ahead of it as well.

Ron Leach  |  Jun 02, 2017  |  1 comments

Serge Ramelli is not only a superb landscape photographer, he’s an expert at teaching his shooting and image-processing techniques to others. In this video Ramelli starts with an intentionally poor image, explains the camera settings he should have used, and then dramatically rehabilitates the photo in Lightroom.

Ron Leach  |  Aug 14, 2017  |  0 comments

Landscape photographers often shoot at smaller apertures to increase depth of field in their images. But while that technique can deliver an “acceptable” zone of sharpness in both the foreground and background, there’s a better approach if what you’re striving for are spectacular images in which acceptable isn’t good enough.

Ron Leach  |  Jul 17, 2017  |  0 comments

Serge Ramelli is a professional Paris-based landscape photographer who’s always willing to share his “secret sauce” for creating better images. In the tutorial below he provides some great advice on composition, camera settings, and retouching that will definitely improve your results.

Ron Leach  |  Oct 25, 2018  |  0 comments

A while back we featured a powerful Photoshop tutorial explaining how to turn daytime photos into night scenes with three simple tips. In the video below, you‘ll see how to do the opposite, by making nighttime photos appear to have been captured at dawn.

Ron Leach  |  Aug 20, 2018  |  1 comments

We all know how a bland, pale sky can spoil an otherwise beautiful nature scene. But if you have a minute to spare, the powerful video below explains how to create dramatic skies and add the WOW factor to images in Photoshop.

Ron Leach  |  Feb 07, 2019  |  0 comments

When all else fails, hitting the streets is a fun and accessible way to make interesting images—both during the day at night. And in the interesting video below, you’ll watch two pros shooting the streets of London, while revealing their secrets for capturing compelling images with mystery and mood.

Ron Leach  |  Nov 21, 2016  |  0 comments

Petar Sabol Sharpeye is an award-winning Croatian photographer with a wide-ranging portfolio. One of his specialties is macro photography, and he’s created some unique images using a Meyer-Optik Goerlitz Trioplan 100mm f/2.8 “Soap Bubble” lens.

Ron Leach  |  Sep 26, 2018  |  1 comments

Fast telephoto lenses have a special mystique in the minds of most outdoor photographers. But what if you can’t afford to purchase exotic big glass? In this eye-opening tutorial, you’ll learn a free and effective alternative to using a long lens.

Shutterbug Staff  |  Jun 26, 2019  |  0 comments

You don't need to head out to the country to shoot landscapes. Actually, city folks can find great landscapes right in their own urban environment. You just have to go off the beaten path a bit.

Ron Leach  |  Mar 10, 2017  |  0 comments

It took two trips to the Arctic Circle for photographer Dale Sharpe to pop the question to his girlfriend Karlie Russell, but as you see here the resulting photos are totally epic. 

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Feb 20, 2015  |  0 comments

Not too long ago we received these notes from photographer Daryl Hawk about his April, 2014, journey across the kingdom of Ladakh:
“Traversed the entire region from the Pakistan border in the west to the Tibetan border in the east…crossed the Khardung pass at 18,380 feet on the highest motorable road in the world…lived with both nomads and residents…explored 25 ancient monasteries and fortresses…tracked snow leopards, discovered petroglyphs and sacred lakes…had a meeting and interview with the King of Ladakh.”

George Schaub  |  May 26, 2015  |  0 comments

A camera enforces a “framing” of the world before you. While you can choose various aspect ratios (from standard to panoramic, from 3:4 to 6:19) the fact remains that you always have to choose what to include and what to leave out of the photo. It’s like constructing a box and deciding what to put inside it. Making those decisions often involves utilizing certain compositional guidelines and tools that artists have used in the past, although like any rules they “are made to be broken.” When deciding which guidelines to apply always remember that content rules, and that context helps tell the tale.

Jeff Wignall  |  Jan 24, 2014  |  First Published: Dec 01, 2013  |  0 comments

One of the primary differences between a photograph and the real world is that reality has three dimensions: height, width, and depth. Your photos, of course, only have two—height and width. Any depth that exists in a photograph is purely an optical illusion. Even if you were able to create a print that was the exact same size as the scene (and wouldn’t that be fun) it would still pale beside the real thing because of the lack of that third dimension.

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