Lighting How To

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Jason D. Page  |  Oct 19, 2014  |  0 comments

In 2004 I was out late one night for a walk on the beach, as I often did to de-stress from a long day at work. This night was particularly beautiful, with a full moon shining overhead, so I decided to bring my camera and tripod along to take some oceanscapes. I found the perfect location, set up my gear, and opened the shutter of my camera for a long exposure. While the exposure was running I accidentally bumped my camera. When I checked the image and saw that the light from the moon had left a streak going across the sky I had an epiphany. My mind raced at the possibilities of using my camera and the moonlight to draw images in the sky, and from that moment on I was a light painter.

Jack Neubart  |  Oct 06, 2015  |  0 comments

Dividing his time between his New York City and Paris studios, photographer Adam Savitch specializes in still life and motion studies for advertising and editorial clients, often with an avant-garde mindset. When it comes to lighting, Savitch believes in the old adage “less is more.” He doesn’t throw a light at every nook and cranny of his tabletop sets. Instead he mostly employs only one light and finesses its effect on the subject.

Ron Leach  |  Feb 16, 2018  |  0 comments

Just about all cameras used for serious photography, and even many point-and-shoot models, enable users to choose how light in a scene is measured. The video below will help you understand the options available, and when one works better than the others.

Ron Leach  |  May 18, 2016  |  0 comments

Shutterbug featured the unique work of expert light painter Jason Page back in 2014, and he has a fascinating new tutorial that will help you learn this popular technique. In this video, Page uses the Light Painting Brushes system to create some imaginative effects.

Dan Havlik  |  Jan 24, 2019  |  0 comments

It’s one of those debates photographers will probably have for eternity: is it better to shoot using only natural light or with strobe lighting? Of course, there’s no right answer but it’s always fun to put both types of lighting to the test.

Ron Leach  |  Jul 26, 2017  |  0 comments

Many portrait photographers employ a portable light to boost ambient illumination and fill in shadows when shooting outdoors. In the four-minute video below you’ll see how simple diffusion panels can modify the quality of light and give you exactly the look you’re after.

Ron Leach  |  Oct 21, 2016  |  0 comments

Brian Hart considers himself a “light artist” who uses a camera and a light source as his pen and paper. The following video is an informal tutorial that will guide you toward creating some dynamic light drawings of your own.

Ron Leach  |  Jan 30, 2018  |  0 comments

Professional photographer Peter McKinnon admits it: He’s always been intimidated by shooting after dark, explaining that “The rules are completely different at night, and it’s a whole different ballgame.” Thus, until recently, McKinnon’s photography always ground to a halt after the sun dropped below the horizon.

Ron Leach  |  Mar 14, 2017  |  0 comments

Commercial photographer J.P. Morgan has over two decades of studio experience, as well as a knack for helping others shoot like a pro. In the video below, Morgan uses his unique teaching style to help you better understand lighting by photographing a ball, cube, and cylinder in one properly lit image.

Ron Leach  |  Oct 27, 2017  |  0 comments

On-camera flash tends to get a bum rap, especially for portrait photography. But if you want to shoot stunning people pictures at night, unencumbered by flash brackets, light modifiers, or other flash attachments, all you have to do is watch the quick tutorial below. 

Jim Zuckerman  |  Mar 27, 2015  |  0 comments
Shadows are an integral part of light, and that means they are an integral part of photography. Everything casts a shadow, however subtle it may be, in virtually all types of lighting conditions. Even a small insect casts a shadow in diffused light. For example, look at the shadows under the legs of the cicada (#1). This was taken with diffused window light.
Jim Zuckerman  |  Nov 20, 2015  |  0 comments
In nature, lighting can make the difference between an okay photo and an amazing shot. Light can even become the subject and can affect composition, exposure, color, focus, feel and mood. This is why most nature photographers work around light, letting it determine when and where they work. In this chapter I’ll talk about the importance of shooting at the right time of day, how the direction of light affects subject matter and how weather plays an essential part.
Barry Tanenbaum  |  Jul 25, 2012  |  First Published: Jun 01, 2012  |  17 comments

The intriguing thing about lightpainting is you never know exactly what you’re going to get. And whatever you get, you won’t get it again. That’s part of the technique’s appeal: you’re creating a one-of-a-kind photograph.

 

Simply, a lightpainting photo is an image made with a handheld, constant light source in a dark room or environment. The camera’s sensor captures only what you choose to illuminate. Lightpainting images can range from relatively simple to fairly complicated. Striking photos can be created indoors with nothing more than a still life subject, a tabletop to put it on, and a small LED penlight to light it. Or you can think big: how about a mega-powerful spotlight illuminating prairie land in the Grand Tetons or a mesa in Monument Valley?

Steve Bedell  |  Oct 11, 2017  |  1 comments

I’ve known John Hartman for many years. He is regarded in the industry as not only an outstanding photographer but also one of the hardest working and most successful photographers in the portrait world.

Jack Neubart  |  Sep 27, 2016  |  0 comments

Joe McNally learned the value of supplementing available light with flash early on in his career as a photojournalist. Currently a Nikon Ambassador who works mainly as a commercial/editorial portrait photographer, McNally has become a staunch advocate for the use of Nikon Speedlights on location, often using these small flashes off camera in multiple lighting setups. McNally even mixes his Speedlights with studio strobes on occasion when the situation warrants.

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