Printer Reviews

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Jon Canfield  |  Jun 07, 2013  |  First Published: May 01, 2013  |  3 comments

Canon’s 13x19”-sized printers, the PIXMA Pro9500 Mark II and PIXMA Pro9000 Mark II, have had a longer life than most, but have been replaced with two new models that are similar to the PIXMA PRO-1, introduced over a year ago. New features on both the pigment-ink PRO-10 and dye-ink PRO-100 include Wi-Fi and AirPrint compatibility, a new plug-in to make printing easier, and a refined inkset.

George Schaub  |  Feb 07, 2013  |  First Published: Jan 01, 2013  |  1 comments

There are those who make prints often, and there are those who make prints occasionally. The split, you might think, is between amateur and pro, but that’s not always the case. Some “amateurs” print as much if not more than some pros, and some pros make their own prints only when they have time, usually for their personal portfolio, but certainly not on every job. That’s why pigeonholing the Epson R3000 in terms of intended audience, amateur or pro, is not so easy. It certainly delivers the quality you might expect from a higher-end Epson model, given its attributes, ink set, fine nozzles, and highly evolved print head, etc., but it’s by no means a volume/production printer, given its single sheet feed for “art” paper, albeit with larger capacity ink carts than some past 13x19” printers, and roll feed capability.

Joe Farace  |  Nov 29, 2012  |  2 comments

There are two general types of inkjet printers available—dye ink and pigment ink. While pigments have the reputation of delivering longer print life, dye inks have the advantage of producing more vibrant colors. The longevity differences are not as much of an issue as they once were, however, with dyes making strides in that direction; in fact, in the case of the Artisan 1430, Epson is claiming up to 200 years in storage, and 98 years on display, and that certainly rivals pigment durability.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Sep 18, 2012  |  First Published: Aug 01, 2012  |  4 comments

Every year the Technical Image Press Association (TIPA), a worldwide association of photo and imaging magazine editors, meets to pick the Best of Class in a wide range of photo categories. As the sole US member of the association, Shutterbug joins editors from Europe, Asia, and Africa in the nominating, judging, and selection process. One of the most exciting aspects of photography today is the constant advancement of technology and design, and this year’s Top Products reflect that spirit and those accomplishments, including new categories of Video D-SLR and Mobile App. Editor George Schaub joins all fellow TIPA members in congratulating those selected to receive the prestigious TIPA award. (To learn more about TIPA, please visit the website at: www.tipa.com.)

George Schaub  |  Apr 06, 2012  |  First Published: Mar 01, 2012  |  1 comments

The new Canon PIXMA PRO-1 is a 13x19” pigment-ink printer that makes fine quality prints in a price range that could be considered quite fair for what you get ($999). Aimed at avid photographers and enthusiast printmakers, as well as pros choosing to do their own mid-size prints, the PIXMA PRO-1 fills a void left by HP’s abandonment of the category and directly challenges Epson. The printer offers ease of use, solid performance, 12 ink cartridges, and all in all seems to improve upon 13” printers of the past. Our tests were aimed at determining if the PIXMA PRO-1 could be a solid contender in its class and if there were upgrades or new workflow techniques that would differentiate it from the competition.

David B. Brooks  |  Mar 14, 2012  |  First Published: Feb 01, 2012  |  17 comments

Pigment inks, CD disc printing, and moderate cost have kept me a loyal user of Epson Stylus Photo printers. I attribute this to the different set of ink colors compared to what’s found in Epson’s professional pigment-ink printers. With the R1900, and now the new R2000, besides the standard cyan, magenta, and yellow, there is red, blue, and orange ink in the set. I find this is favorable to reproducing all my favorite photography subjects, including people, flowers, and landscapes. But, you might ask, without support for black-and-white grayscale printing, how do I get by? Well, I actually use my R1900 to print black-and-white images and a good part of my testing with the R2000 involved printing black-and-white photographs as well.

George Schaub  |  Aug 18, 2011  |  First Published: Jul 01, 2011  |  2 comments

I took on this review assignment because I’ve had considerable history with printing, both silver and digital, and printing with Epson printers. Over the past few years this interest has led me on an odyssey through various printers, profiling, and a considerable amount of (early) frustration. My emphasis has been on monochrome printing and those who share in this interest and who have attempted black-and-white printing in the past understand the numerous obstacles it can present. Those include, but are not limited to, unwanted color casts, gloss differential in deep black areas and some tonal borders, poor deep black reproduction (accompanied by equally poor highlight repro), a lot of poor paper surfaces, and the hassle and waste of switching from matte black to photo glossy inks. Color printers face these as well, plus the challenges of color balance, casts, skin tone reproduction, highlight bias, green shadows, and more. Of late I have printed with the Epson Stylus Pro 3800, 3880, and 4800 models, the 3800 being my studio workhorse for years and the 3880 the model that many photo schools and workshops at which I’ve taught use as a mainstay student and production printer.

George Schaub  |  Sep 01, 2010  |  2 comments

Canon’s latest entrants in the 24” segment are the iPF6350/iPF6300 imagePROGRAF printers, essentially the same except for the addition of an 80GB hard drive on the iPF6350 that can store information on jobs and images themselves.

Jon Canfield  |  Jul 01, 2010  |  1 comments

Among digital photographers who are looking for quality prints with a good archival life, odds are that you’ll hear the Epson name mentioned, including the 13” R2880 and 17” and larger Stylus Pro printers. The Epson line is known for excellent quality output on a variety of media types, as well as a long archival life through their pigment inks. Recently, Epson added two new...

Jon Canfield  |  Apr 01, 2010  |  0 comments

Epson’s 17” Stylus Pro 3800 has been one of the most popular printers in its size for the past three years. With a good combination of price and size, this C-sized printer has filled the needs of photographers looking for the ability to print 17x22” on a variety of media without the bulk or expense of a large format printer.

 

Since the introduction of the 3800, Epson has...

Sally Wiener Grotta and Daniel Grotta  |  Apr 01, 2010  |  1 comments

While most of us produce an occasional flurry of snapshot-sized or picture-frameable prints, some photographers are in the business of generating dozens, scores, or hundreds of prints at one go. Part of the package—and fun—of event photography (weddings, bar mitzvahs, trade shows, business meetings, school pageants, costume parties, and so on) is passing out or selling just-shot...

Jon Canfield  |  Jan 01, 2010  |  0 comments

I decided to take a look at two new AiO devices, the Canon PIXMA MP980 and the HP Photosmart Premium Fax All-in-One to see how they did with photo printing and scanning—two functions that any photographer needs.

Jon Canfield  |  Jun 01, 2009  |  0 comments

The new sweet spot for printer sizes appears to be 13x19”, or A3+/Super B. Large enough to print 11x14” photos, while still fitting on the average desktop.

Jon Canfield  |  Nov 01, 2008  |  0 comments

Three years ago, Epson brought out a solid 13x19” printer using the new UltraChrome K3 inks. This model, the R2400, was a major improvement over the 2200 it replaced, thanks to the additional gray inks and a new Advanced Black and White mode in the printer driver. Three years is nearly forever in the digital market, and people have been wondering when a replacement would come and what...

Pages

X