Outdoor Photography How To

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Barry Tanenbaum  |  Feb 10, 2015  |  0 comments

“It was a two-month expedition, and it had taken weeks just to hike into the area and weeks to get to this point on the mountain,” photographer Tom Bol recalls about the above image.

Jim Zuckerman  |  Jan 22, 2015  |  0 comments
The beauty and artistry of the natural designs found in rocks and minerals rivals the most expensive abstract paintings you might find in an art gallery. Some of them are truly breathtaking. Of course, not all rocks are created equal. Some are boring and not worth a second glance, but others are works of art and, if you were to print the images very large and frame them elegantly for your home, people would think you paid thousands of dollars for such a visually compelling piece of art.
Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Jan 21, 2015  |  0 comments

For centuries, scientists have labored to understand the nature of light. Some ancient Greeks believed that light was emitted from the eyeball the same way a bat sends out an echolocation chirp which allows him to determine his precise position in physical space. Understandably, there were problems with that hypothesis. Other theories followed. Those who embraced the wave theory were right—mostly. Light behaves like a wave up to a certain point. Similarly, those who professed the particle theory were also correct—partly.

Dan Havlik  |  Jan 13, 2015  |  0 comments

If you want a shot of inspiration to motivate you to go out and shoot great photos, check out the beautiful video below, titled “Before You Wake Up.”

Steve Meltzer  |  Dec 26, 2014  |  0 comments

Carleton Watkins was perhaps America’s greatest 19th century landscape photographer yet today he’s largely unknown. His breathtaking landscapes of the Yosemite Valley were instrumental in preserving the valley for future generations and paving the way for both the National Parks system and the environmental movement.

Blaine Harrington  |  Dec 26, 2014  |  0 comments

According to a photo industry writer I know, I do something that’s a bit unusual: I freely admit that sometimes I’m too close to my own photographs to judge them objectively, and because of that, I ask for help.

Steve Bedell  |  Dec 09, 2014  |  0 comments

I recently received a copy of the University of New Hampshire Magazine and was immediately struck by the cover image of a rock climber dangling from a cliff over water. I not only noticed the storytelling aspects of the image but, as a photographer, that this guy hanging from his fingertips was somehow lit from some unseen light source. My first reaction: how did he do that?

Lorin R. Robinson  |  Dec 09, 2014  |  0 comments

In May, 2010, during one of his many trips to Tanzania, Norton was informed by local Maasai tribesmen of government plans to build a highway bisecting the northern part of the Serengeti, the storied 5700 square-mile national park listed among the 10 wonders of the world.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Dec 05, 2014  |  0 comments

TIPA (Technical Image Press Asssociation) continues to celebrate the significant role photography plays in our daily lives. In spite of the rapid advance of new technology in the manufacture of cameras, the essence of photography never really changes. With this in mind, TIPA invites Shutterbug readers to submit their photographs to the TIPA Photo Tropby 2015 photo contest, which has the theme of: "Discover the world: open your eyes to the beauty of planet Earth.”

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Nov 25, 2014  |  0 comments

“Photography is always a bit random in the UK because the weather is so changeable,” Martin Turner says. When he and his friends arrived late in the afternoon at the Weston-super-Mare seaside resort in North Somerset, they were greeted by “absolute, gorgeous sunshine.” Which lasted about 45 minutes. “All of a sudden the sky went black,” Turner says, “and we had to stand underneath the pier whilst it chucked down rain for quite a while.” Then the clouds broke, and at about 8:00 in the evening he was able to capture this sunset image.

Blaine Harrington  |  Oct 29, 2014  |  0 comments

Chuck Berry was right. “It goes to show you never can tell,” he wrote, and sang, and that phrase is as appropriate a way to begin this column as any I can think of. I certainly never can tell which photo will please the client, fulfill the assignment, or sell well through my stock agencies; in other words, which one will succeed in the marketplace.

Jim Zuckerman  |  Oct 27, 2014  |  0 comments

Every photographer has a personal vision and a particular taste in composition, light, color and so on. For example, many photographers chose nature’s details simply to abstract the color and form they find. Others like to use extremely shallow depth of field—also called selective focus—so only a sliver of the subject is sharp while the rest of it is soft. People who are intrigued by the beauty, intricacy and complexity of nature usually shoot with the opposite approach. They want to reveal as much detail in the subjects as possible so those who view their work can appreciate the designs and the patterns in the images with tack sharp clarity.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Oct 23, 2014  |  0 comments

Forget Photoshop for a few—let’s talk about three physical filters that you’ll fully enjoy while the fall foliage flourishes as well as later when the yearend holiday festivities finally flow in. In fact, you’ll find them fun to use anytime, frankly. 

Jason D. Page  |  Oct 19, 2014  |  0 comments

In 2004 I was out late one night for a walk on the beach, as I often did to de-stress from a long day at work. This night was particularly beautiful, with a full moon shining overhead, so I decided to bring my camera and tripod along to take some oceanscapes. I found the perfect location, set up my gear, and opened the shutter of my camera for a long exposure. While the exposure was running I accidentally bumped my camera. When I checked the image and saw that the light from the moon had left a streak going across the sky I had an epiphany. My mind raced at the possibilities of using my camera and the moonlight to draw images in the sky, and from that moment on I was a light painter.

Dan Havlik  |  Oct 09, 2014  |  1 comments

Ok, this should give you a good chuckle this morning. Photographer Tony Northrup has teamed up with his wife Chelsea, who's also a photographer, to create a hilarious video called “Stuff that Annoys Wildlife Photographers.”

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