Film Photography News

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Roger W. Hicks  |  Feb 01, 2008  |  0 comments

There is a saying: remember, you are unique, just like every other human being. There is also the question of how far we are shaped by our genes, and how far by our upbringing.

 

Similar observations apply to infrared (IR) films. No two emulsions are quite the same (genetic uniqueness), and even with the same emulsion, each photographer has a different regime for...

George Schaub  |  Dec 01, 2007  |  0 comments

Last year we reported that Fujifilm had promised to be the "last man standing" when it came to maintaining and introducing new films, and we are happy to report that their promise has been kept. With a recently introduced Fujichrome Provia 400 and a return of Fujichrome Velvia 50, the company continues to upgrade its chrome film line with new emulsions that improve...

Robert E. Mayer  |  Jul 01, 2007  |  0 comments

After a thorough walk about the entire two-floor trade show at the 2007 PMA this old photographer was pleasantly surprised to learn that in spite of some type or form of digitizing being involved in nearly everything photographic displayed at the show, film is not dead--yet!

The Agfa brand is getting back into the market in the U.S.A. with Vista color...

Steve Anchell  |  May 01, 2007  |  0 comments

It is interesting that as digital imaging began its ascendancy film reached an all-time high in quality: hue, saturation, and sharpness, all of which meant digital had to try harder to be better. One of the films that stood out were the Kodak Professional Portra color negative emulsions, which in the last 10 years have become a favorite for photographers worldwide.

 

So...

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz  |  Mar 01, 2007  |  0 comments

The name says it all: Rollei's ScanFilm 400CN Pro is an ISO 400 color negative film (Kodak C-41 compatible) for scanning, rather than for wet printing. The big difference is that the orange mask, incorporated in almost all color negative films since the 1950s, is omitted: it just isn't needed if you are scanning.

On the other hand, the orange mask is no...

George Schaub  |  Oct 01, 2005  |  0 comments

Many moons ago I was granted a few test rolls of the then-new Fujichrome Velvia 50. I happened to be in Las Vegas at the time, and curious just how saturated this touted high-saturation film might be I hiked around red rock country and exposed a few rolls. Having been a dedicated slide shooter and film tester for another photo mag I was pretty familiar with slide films and how...

Frances E. Schultz  |  Nov 01, 2004  |  0 comments

A 50th anniversary is something very special: a golden anniversary, which is a good trick for something made of silver, is what Kodak Tri-X celebrates this year. The first of the X-films was Panatomic-X in 1938. Two-thirds of a century later, there's some doubt about what the X was for: probably "Extra," as it was faster and sharper and finer grained than the...

Roger K. Bunting  |  Sep 01, 2003  |  2 comments

A century and a half of research and development in photographic processing technology has given us some mighty fine materials to work with. The ease and speed of processing high quality black and white photos with today's materials is truly...

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