Compact Camera Reviews

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Cynthia Boylan  |  Jan 07, 2016  |  0 comments

Holga 135 BC Plastic Lens 35mm Film Camera: The BC stands for Black Corners effect and it creates prominent vignettes in your 35mm photos. The Holga uses all 35mmm formats films and it can operate without any batteries. There is a hot shoe on 135 BC, that allows you to use a flash when taking pictures at dark environments ( the flash is available separately). The Holga 135 BC is a fixed focus camera that offers four choices of object distances and two choice of aperture (f/11 and f/8). The Multiple Exposure effect can be easily achieve by not advancing the film after a frame has been exposed. There is a Lens/Filter for different effects available as an optional accessory. 

Edited by George Schaub  |  Dec 18, 2015  |  0 comments

The new PowerShot G5 X is based on the same sensor system as the G7 X. It uses a 1-inch sensor (BSI technology) with 20MP and a professional 3:2 aspect ratio. Compared to the G7 X, the G5 X has a lot of new and additional features, including a high-resolution electronic viewfinder with 2.36 million RGB dots that is based on OLED technology. By default, the viewfinder offers a frame rate of 30 frames per second, being the most efficient power-saving mode.

Henry Anderson  |  Dec 01, 2015  |  0 comments

When I first heard about the Canon PowerShot G3 X ($999), I fully expected that I was going to hate it. Could there really be a good reason for someone to buy a compact camera stuffed with a 25x (24-600mm equivalent) zoom lens? After all, how often does the average photographer go from wide angle to superzoom to warrant the size and weight that a lens like that requires?

George Schaub  |  Sep 25, 2015  |  0 comments

The Technical Image Press Association (TIPA) member magazines recently convened for their General Assembly to vote for the best photo and imaging products launched by the industry in the last 12 months. The voting took place during the General Assembly that was held in spring 2015 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Jul 27, 2015  |  2 comments

It’s July and Leica just confirmed that I can pick up a sample of the new LEICA Q (Typ 116) digital camera at their headquarters tomorrow. I became eager to try one after reading Dan Havlik’s hands-on, first-look review last month. Leica is allowing me to borrow the sample for exactly six days. Here's my look at this intriguing but expensive new full-frame, compact camera from Leica.

Dan Havlik  |  Jun 30, 2015  |  0 comments

We reviewed the amazing Nikon Coolpix P900 last month and were blown away by its incredible 83x (24-2000mm in 35mm equivalent) optical zoom lens. Now we’ve seen something even more astounding from this camera.

Dan Havlik  |  Jun 10, 2015  |  0 comments

Leica just unveiled a slick, new compact camera this morning: the 24-megapixel, full frame Leica Q. The Leica Q camera features a Leica Summilux 28mm f /1.7 ASPH integrated lens and a host of features, making it Leica’s premium compact camera.

Edited by George Schaub  |  May 26, 2015  |  0 comments

Panasonic’s LX100 is the top-of-the-line camera in the company’s compact LX series. Compared to other LX models, it is the first camera with an MFT (Micro Four Thirds) sensor. However, the camera doesn’t use the whole image sensor area of 17.3x13mm, so its crop factor is 2.2x instead of the 2.0x of standard MFT cameras.

Jack Neubart  |  May 11, 2015  |  0 comments

I’ve often wished I had a camera that could go from 24mm to 2000mm at the touch of a button and without being weighed down by a ton of glass. Okay, maybe not all the way to 2000mm and perhaps not in a power zoom, but you get my point. The Nikon Coolpix P900 superzoom (super-duper-zoom?) camera gives you that reach in a fairly compact body, relative to a lens with such a broad range of focal lengths.

Jack Neubart  |  Mar 13, 2015  |  0 comments

I was really excited to get my hands on Canon’s latest G-series camera, the PowerShot G7 X. In fact, I was looking for this camera to replace my current point-and-shoot because I’d wanted something that was still pocket-size, but with Raw capture, a feature lacking in my own camera. And the G7 X was a more economical alternative to a mirrorless model, which would also tempt me with its array of extra lenses and accessories.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Feb 24, 2015  |  0 comments

For a compact camera, the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II has a large image sensor; in fact, it is slightly larger than the sensor found in Micro Four Thirds cameras. The G1 X II offers a moderate resolution of 13 megapixels, with maximum resolution in images with an aspect ratio of 4:3. By default, however, the camera is set to an aspect ratio of 3:2 that delivers slightly less image resolution.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Jan 09, 2015  |  0 comments

The Fujifilm X100T is the newest camera of the X model series. It uses an APS-C sized sensor with 16MP and has a 23mm integral lens, equivalent to nearly 35mm in 35mm film format. The lens is fast at f2.0 and offers very sharp, crisp images.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Dec 11, 2014  |  0 comments

In 2013, Sony introduced two extraordinary cameras – the QX10 and the QX100. Both were based on compact cameras (WX100 and RX100 II), but didn't have “camera bodies” and LCD screens. Instead, they consisted of a lens, image sensor, image processor and a storage media system and both needed either a smartphone or tablet computer to serve as the “external camera.” The newest in the QX line is the QX1. The main camera concept is similar to the 2013 models, but the QX1 offers a large APS-C sensor with 20MP resolution and an E mount for interchangeable lenses.

Jack Neubart  |  Dec 05, 2014  |  0 comments

One of the hottest categories these days are so-called “tough” cameras. They’re able to handle the elements on hikes and climbs made by hardy souls, are ideal for divers who want to record the wonders of the (fairly) deep, and are excellent choices for less arduous adventures, like a sunset stroll on a wind-blown Caribbean beach where a more delicate and expensive DSLR might be at risk. All can handle the rough and tumble of life where no mobile phone dares tread.

Dan Havlik  |  Sep 17, 2014  |  0 comments

Fujifilm was showing off its new toys at photokina today and we got some hands-on time with these latest X-series cameras and lenses. Initially announced on September 10th, the Fujifilm X100T and XT-1 Graphite Silver cameras, and Fujinon XF50-140mm F2.8 R LM OIS WR and XF56mm F1.2 R APD lenses continue to build on Fuji’s compact and retro-style (Fuji would say “classic" style) X-Series line.

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